Howards End

Front Cover
Knopf, 1910 - Fiction - 359 pages
42 Reviews

First published in 1910, Howards End is the novel that earned E. M. Forster recognition as a major writer.

At its heart lie two families--the wealthy and business-minded Wilcoxes and the cultured and idealistic Schlegels. When the beautiful and independent Helen Schlegel begins an impetuous affair with the ardent Paul Wilcox, a series of events is sparked--some very funny, some very tragic--that results in a dispute over who will inherit Howards End, the Wilcoxes' charming country home.

As much about the clash between individual wills as the clash between the sexes and the classes, Howards End is a novel whose central tenet, "Only connect," remains a powerful prescription for modern life.

Introduction by Alfred Kazan

(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ImperfectCJ - LibraryThing

This novel is beautifully written and, for a book written before World War I, surprisingly relevant to today's political and social climate. The central conflict seems to be between Margaret's ideals ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - benuathanasia - LibraryThing

The story as a whole is take-it or leave-it. Nothing special, groundbreaking, breathtaking, etc; no characters of particular interest or note. Whatever. What I enjoyed about this book was the philosophical discourse and how amusingly outdated - and yet somehow prescient - it was. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
6
Section 3
32
Section 4
47
Section 5
58
Section 6
75
Section 7
76
Section 8
82
Section 16
192
Section 17
202
Section 18
211
Section 19
216
Section 20
227
Section 21
244
Section 22
251
Section 23
255

Section 9
112
Section 10
120
Section 11
131
Section 12
144
Section 13
156
Section 14
164
Section 15
184
Section 24
303
Section 25
306
Section 26
317
Section 27
326
Section 28
345
Section 29
359
Copyright

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About the author (1910)

Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879, attended Tonbridge School as a day boy, and went on to King's College, Cambridge, in 1897. With King's he had a lifelong connection and was elected to an Honorary Fellowship in 1946. He declared that his life as a whole had not been dramatic, and he was unfailingly modest about his achievements. Interviewed by the BBC on his eightieth birthday, he said: 'I have not written as much as I'd like to . . . I write for two reasons: partly to make money and partly to win the respect of people whom I respect . . . I had better add that I am quite sure I am not a great novelist.' Eminent critics and the general public have judged otherwise and in his obituary The Times called him 'one of the most esteemed English novelists of his time'.He wrote six novels, four of which appeared before the First World War, Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908), and Howard's End (1910). An interval of fourteen years elapsed before he published A Passage to India. It won both the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Maurice, his novel on a homosexual theme, finished in 1914, was published posthumously in 1971. He also published two volumes of short stories; two collections of essays; a critical work, Aspects of the Novel; The Hill of Devi, a fascinating record of two visits Forster made to the Indian State of Dewas Senior; two biographies; two books about Alexandria (where he worked for the Red Cross in the First World War); and, with Eric Crozier, the libretto for Britten's opera Billy Budd. He died in June 1970.

Bibliographic information