Once Upon a Country: A Palestinian Life

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Macmillan, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 542 pages
3 Reviews
A prominent Palestinian's searching, anguished, deeply affecting autobiography, in which his life story comes to be the story of the recent history of his country.
Sari Nusseibeh's autobiography is a remarkable book--one in which his dramatic life story and that of his embattled country converge in a work of great passion, depth, and emotional power. Nusseibeh was raised to represent his country. His family's roots in Palestine traced back to the Middle Ages, and his father was the governor of Jerusalem. Educated at Oxford, he was trained to build upon his father's support for coexistence and a negotiated solution to the problems of the region.
But the wars of 1967 and 1973 spelled the beginning of the end for the vision of a unified Palestine--and Nusseibeh's response to these events, and to those that followed, gives us the recent history from a Palestinian point of view as no book has done. From his time teaching side by side with Israelis at Hebrew University through his appointment by Yassir Arafat to administer Arab Jerusalem, he holds fast to a two-state solution, even as the powers around him insist that it is impossible. As Palestine is torn apart by settlements and barricades, corruption and violence, Nusseibeh remains true to the ideals of his youth, determined to keep hold of some faint hope for the life of his country.
"Once Upon a Country "is a book with the scope and vitality of an old-fashioned novel--one whose ending is still uncertain.
 

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Review: Once Upon a Country: A Palestinian Life

User Review  - Baljit - Goodreads

Sari presents a frank account of his life in Palestine, his philosophy, his role as an activist and politician. Despite the breakdown in peace talks over and over again, he remains ever hopeful that ... Read full review

Review: Once Upon a Country: A Palestinian Life

User Review  - Lauren - Goodreads

This is a really interesting book, although it is more political memoir than autobiography. Still, for most Americans (and I believe we are who it was written for), it will offer a unique perspective on the Israel/Palestine situation, the PLO, and the peace process. Highly recommended. Read full review

Contents

Prologue A Fairy Tale
3
Three Promises Promises
25
Thirteen Masquerade
202
Seventeen Sticks and Stones
248
Twentythree A Shadow Government
353
Twentyseven Holy of Holies
420
Twentyeight The Possessed
428
Twentynine Allies
444
Thirty Checkmate
456
Notes
537
Acknowledgments
543
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Sari Nusseibeh, a philosopher, was the Palestine Liberation Organization's chief representative in Jerusalem from 2001 to 2002, in which role he advocated a two-state solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict. He is the president of and a professor at Al-Quds University, the Arab University of Jerusalem. Nusseibeh was educated at Oxford and Harvard, and was a Radcliffe Institute Fellow at Harvard for 2004-05. He is the author of two previous books.

Anthony David is the editor and translator of "Gershom Scholem: A Life in Letters," He holds a doctorate in European history from the University of Chicago and has received the Fritz Halber Prize and a Mellon Foundation fellowship. He lives in New Mexico.

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