The Telling

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Ace Books, 2000 - Fiction - 246 pages
14 Reviews
Sutty, an Observer for the interstellar Ekumen, has been assigned to Aka, a world in the grip of a materialistic government. The monolithic Corporation State of Aka has outlawed all old customs and beliefs. Sutty herself, an Earthwoman, has fled from a similar monolithic state - but one controlled by religious fundamentalists.
Unexpectedly she receives permission to leave the modern city where her movements were closely monitored. She travels up the river into the countryside, going from howling loudspeakers to bleating cattle, to seek the remnants of the banned culture of Aka. As she comes to know and love the people she lives with, she begins to learn their unique religion - the Telling. Finally joining them on a trek into the high mountains to one of the last sacred places, she glimpses hope for the reconciliation of the warring ideologies that have filled their lives, and her own, with grief.

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Review: The Telling (Hainish Cycle #8)

User Review  - Danielle - Goodreads

When I was at the library this weekend, I was actually looking for The Dispossessed to read, but this was the only one on the shelf by Le Guin that wasn't part of the Earthsea series. I didn't know ... Read full review

Review: The Telling (Hainish Cycle #8)

User Review  - B. - Goodreads

(I chose to compare this book to a nonfiction work for my review.) The alien civilization in Ursula K Le Guin's The Telling is deeply evocative of post-Cultural Revolution China. A few months ago I ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Ursula K. Le Guin was born in Berkeley, California, in 1929. Her novels include Rocannon's World, Planet of Exile, City of Illusions, and The Left Hand of Darkness. With the awarding of the 1975 Hugo and Nebula Awards to The Dispossessed, she became the first author to win both awards twice for novels. Le Guin lives in Portland, Oregon.

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