Beyond Cheering and Bashing: New Perspectives on the Closing of the American Mind

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Popular Press, 1992 - Education - 166 pages
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The debate over the central issue confronted in The Closing of the American Mind—the role of the university and the liberal arts in the United States—has become increasingly urgent and contentious. The goal of this collection of essays is to see what we can learn about the dilemmas confronting American culture through consideration of both The Closing of the American Mind and the debate it aroused.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Where Did It Go Wrong?
7
The Good the Bad and the Ugly in Amerikas Akademia
36
Strange Bedfellows and their Offspring
49
A Feminist Reads The Closing of the American Mind
55
A Bloom Amid the ReaganBushes
68
The Great Books vs America
90
An American Tale
98
Narrative Elements
111
On ReOpening
117
Arbiters of Culture
127
Allan Bloom and the Limits of Reason
141
On Mimesis as Freedom
151
Response
161
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About the author (1992)

James Seaton is a Professor in the Department of English at Michigan State University, where he teaches courses on the history of literary criticism, American literature and culture, and literature and law. His previous books include Cultural Conservatism, Political Liberalism: From Criticism to Cultural Studies (1996) and A Reading of Vergil's Georgics (1983). He is the editor of The Genteel Tradition and Character and Opinion in the United States by George Santayana (2009) and co-editor with William K. Buckley of Beyond Cheering and Bashing: New Perspectives on The Closing of the American Mind (1992). Seaton's articles and reviews have appeared in such publications as The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The Claremont Review of Books, The American Scholar, The Hudson Review, The University Bookman, Modern Age, Journal of the History of Ideas, Society, The Review of Metaphysics, the Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities, Legal Studies Forum, Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature, and Michigan State Law Review.

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