Fast Food: Roadside Restaurants in the Automobile Age

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JHU Press, 2002 - Architecture - 416 pages
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Eating on the run has a long history in America, but it was the automobile that created a whole new category of dining: fast food. In the final volume of their Gas, Food, Lodging trilogy, John Jakle and Keith Sculle contemplate the origins, architecture, and commercial growth of fast food restaurants from White Castle to McDonald's.
 

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Contents

Introduction 1
17
The Rise of the QuickService Restaurant
21
QuickService Restaurants in the Age of Automobile Convenience
40
Restaurant Chains
68
Hamburger Places Part 1
94
Hamburger Places Part 2
114
McDonalds
139
Sandwich Places
163
Seafood Places
229
Pizza Places
240
Taco Places and Mexican Cantinas
257
Steak Places
265
Concept Restaurants
277
The Roadside Restaurant in Springfield Illinois
296
Conclusion
322
Notes
335

Ice Cream Places
178
Breakfast Places
197
Chicken Places
212

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About the author (2002)

John A. Jakle is an emeritus professor of geography and landscape architecture at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is a coauthor, with Keith A. Sculle, of five books related to automobile culture in America, including Lots of Parking and Fast Food.

Keith A. Sculle is the head of research and education at the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. He is a coathor, with John A. Jakle, of five books related to automobile culture in America, including Lots of Parking and Fast Food.

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