John Dee: The Politics of Reading and Writing in the English Renaissance

Front Cover
Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 291 pages
0 Reviews
This book presents a major reassessment of the career and cultural background of John Dee (1527-1609), one of Elizabethan England's most interesting figures. Challenging the conventional image of the isolated, eccentric philosopher, Sherman situates Dee in a fresh context, revealing that he was a well-connected adviser to the academic, courtly, and commercial circles of his day. The centerpiece of Dee's life is shown to be the massive library and museum at Mortlake, perhaps the first modern "think tank." There he lived, worked, and entertained some of the period's most influential intellectuals and politicians. Sherman discusses Dee's household arrangements, reading practices, and writings on subjects ranging from calendar reform to imperial policy. He also offers the first detailed account of the broad network of scholars and other experts who, along with Dee, operated behind the political scenes, providing textual and technological support during this time of unprecedented intellectual and global expansion.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VII
29
IX
53
XI
79
XIII
115
XV
128
XVII
148
XIX
152
XX
171
XXI
182
XXII
192
XXIII
201
XXIV
253
XXV
281
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - I gave Mr. Richard Candish the copy of Paracelsus twelve lettres, written in French with my own hand ; and he promised me, before my wife, never to disclose to any that he hath it ; and that yf he dye before me he will restore it agayn to me ; but if I dy befor him, that he shall deliver it to one of my sonnes, most fit among them to have it.
Page 29 - ... to the publick ; yet in effect it is no more then a dead Bodie as now it is constituted, in comparison of what it might bee, if it were animated with a publick spirit to keep and use it, and ordered as it might bee for public service.
Page 39 - ... his work then is to bee a Factor and Trader for helps to Learning, and a Treasurer to keep them, and a dispenser to applie them to use, or to see them well used, or at least not abused...
Page 46 - Tis there that I am in my kingdom, and there I endeavour to make myself an absolute monarch, and to sequester this one corner from all society, conjugal, filial, and civil; elsewhere I have but verbal authority only, and of a confused essence.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1995)

William H. Sherman is assistant professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Bibliographic information