The Literary Culture of the Reformation: Grammar and Grace

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Dec 5, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 488 pages
0 Reviews
The Literary Culture of the Reformation examines the place of literature in the Reformation, considering both how arguments about biblical meaning and literary interpretation influenced the new theology, and how developments in theology in turn influenced literary practices. Part One focuses on Northern Europe, reconsidering the relationship between Renaissance humanism (especially Erasmus) and religious ideas (especially Luther). Parts Two and Three examine Tudor and early Stuart England. Part Two describes the rise of vernacular theology and protestant culture in relation to fundamental changes in the understanding of the English language. Part Three studies English religious poetry (including Donne, Herbert, and in an Epilogue, Milton) in the wake of these changes. Bringing together genres and styles of writing which are normally kept apart (poems, sermons, treatises, commentaries) Brian Cummings offers a major re-evaluation of the literary production of this intensely verbal and controversial period.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Humanism and Theology in Northern Europe 15121527
55
The English Language and the English Reformations 15211603
185
Literature and the English Reformations 15801640
279
Epilogue
419

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information