Illustrated Cabinet Edition [of the Works Of] Jane Austen, Volume 5

Front Cover
D. Estes, 1906
 

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Contents

I
1
II
7
III
17
IV
25
V
31
VI
36
VII
44
VIII
56
XVII
175
XVIII
181
XIX
190
XX
197
XXI
210
XXII
223
XXIII
238
XXIV
249

IX
68
X
82
XI
99
XII
112
XIII
120
XIV
134
XV
149
XVI
163
XXV
261
XXVI
274
XXVII
285
XXVIII
291
XXIX
306
XXX
320
XXXI
333

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Page 259 - What have you been judging from? Remember the country and the age in which we live. Remember that we are English: that we are Christians. Consult your own understanding, your own sense of the probable, your own observation of what is passing around
Page 34 - when they walked, pinned up each other's train for the dance, and were not to be divided in the set; and, if a rainy morning deprived them of other enjoyments, they were still resolute in meeting in defiance of wet and dirt, and shut themselves up to read novels together. Yes, novels; for I will not adopt that
Page 23 - Thank you; for now we shall soon be acquainted, as I am authorized to tease you on this subject whenever we meet, and nothing in the world advances intimacy so much." They danced again; and when the assembly closed, parted, on the lady's side at least, with a strong inclination for continuing the
Page 92 - That you think they cannot be compared together?" "To be sure not. People that marry can never part, but must go and keep house together. People that dance, only stand opposite to each other in a long room for half an hour." "And such is your definition of
Page 270 - Such a sister-in-law, Henry, I should delight in," said Eleanor, with a smile. "But, perhaps," observed Catherine, "though she has behaved so ill by our family, she may behave better by yours. Now she has really got the man she likes, she may be constant." "Indeed, I am afraid she will,
Page 109 - No, he is not," said Catherine, warmly; "for I am sure he could not afford it." "And why cannot he afford it?" "Because he has not money enough." "And whose fault is that?" "Nobody's that I know of." Thorpe then said something in the loud, incoherent way to which he had often recourse, about
Page 76 - twenty years after it is fairly worn out. Lord bless you! I would undertake for five pounds to drive it to York and back again without losing a nail." Catherine listened with astonishment. She knew not how to reconcile two such very different accounts of the same thing; for she had not. been brought up to understand
Page 83 - style than ever; you mischievous creature, do you want to attract everybody? I assure you., my brother is quite in love with you already; and as for Mr Tilney—but that is a settled thing—even your modesty cannot doubt his attachment now; his coming back to Bath makes it too plain. Oh! what
Page 13 - in the tea-room, she felt yet more the awkwardness of having no party to join, no acquaintance to claim, no gentleman to assist them. They saw nothing of Mr Allen; and after looking about them in vain for a more eligible situation, were obliged to sit down at the end of
Page 214 - walls so solemn! She had nothing to dread from midnight assassins or drunken gallants. Henry had certainly been only in jest in what he had told her that morning. In a house so furnished, and so guarded, she could have nothing to explore or to suffer, and might go to her bed-room as securely as if it had

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