Persuasion

Front Cover
Dent, 1898 - 261 pages
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User Review  - equusregia - LibraryThing

My favorite by Austen, one of my favorite books of any kind. Autumnal, mature, with main characters who have both had to grow up and come into themselves before they can repair their relationship ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nmhale - LibraryThing

Reading Jane Austen is like sitting on a lazy summer day and soaking in the sun on a grassy field. It's been such a long time since I read one of my favorite writers, and I had forgotten how enjoyable ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
9
III
16
IV
24
V
30
VI
41
VII
52
VIII
63
XIII
121
XIV
130
XV
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XVI
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XVII
154
XVIII
165
XIX
178
XX
185

IX
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X
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XI
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XII
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XXI
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XXII
218
XXIII
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XXIV
256

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 242 - Ah!" cried Captain Harville, in a tone of strong feeling, "if I could but make you comprehend what a man suffers when he takes a last look at his wife and children, and watches the boat that he has sent them off in, as long as it is in sight, and then turns away and says, "God knows whether we ever meet again!
Page 114 - By this time the report of the accident had spread among the workmen and boatmen about the Cobb, and many were collected near them, to be useful if wanted; at any rate, to enjoy the sight of a dead young lady, — nay, two dead young ladies, for it proved twice as fine as the first report.
Page 61 - So altered that he should not have known her again! " These were words which could not but dwell with her. Yet she soon began to rejoice that she had heard them. They were of sobering tendency; they allayed agitation; they composed, and consequently must make her happier.
Page 86 - ... the ploughs at work, and the fresh made path spoke the farmer counteracting the sweets of poetical despondence, and meaning to have spring again, they gained the summit of the most considerable hill, which parted Uppercross and Winthrop, and soon commanded a full view of the latter, at the foot of the hill on the other side.
Page 29 - ... she had no reason to believe him married. " How eloquent could Anne Elliot have been, — how eloquent, at least, were her wishes, on the side of early warm attachment, and a cheerful confidence in futurity, against that over-anxious caution which seems to insult exertion and distrust Providence ! — She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older — the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.
Page 68 - They were actually on the same sofa, for Mrs Musgrove had most readily made room for him; they were divided only by Mrs Musgrove. It was no insignificant barrier, indeed. Mrs Musgrove was of a comfortable, substantial size, infinitely more fitted by nature to express good cheer and good humour than tenderness and sentiment; and while the agitations of Anne's slender form, and pensive face, may be considered as very completely screened, Captain Wentworth should be allowed some credit for the selfcommand...
Page 188 - The last few hours were certainly very painful," replied Anne: "but when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure. One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering— which was by no means the case at Lyme.
Page 256 - WHO can be in doubt of what followed ? When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort.
Page 27 - Had she not imagined herself consulting his good, even more than her own, she could hardly have given him up. The belief of being prudent, and self-denying principally for his advantage, was her chief consolation, under the misery of a parting — a final parting...
Page 164 - Mr. Elliot was rational, discreet, polished, — but he was not open. There was never any burst of feeling, any warmth of indignation or delight, at the evil or good of others.

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