The Oriental Herald and Journal of General Literature, Volume 14

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James Silk Buckingham
J. M. Richardson, 1827 - Great Britain
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Page 55 - And they set on for him by himself, and for them by themselves, and for the Egyptians, which did eat with him, by themselves: because the Egyptians might not eat bread with the Hebrews; for that is an abomination unto the Egyptians.
Page 367 - I do not like thee, Doctor Fell; The reason why I cannot tell; But this I know and know full well. I do not like thee. Doctor Fell!
Page 80 - pothecaries, taught the art By doctor's bills to play the doctor's part, Bold in the practice of mistaken rules, Prescribe, apply, and call their masters fools.
Page 29 - ... receives the inhabitants under his protection and grants them their property he has a power to fix such terms and conditions as he thinks proper. He is entrusted with making the treaty of peace; he may yield up the conquest or retain it upon what terms he pleases. These powers no man ever disputed, neither has it hitherto been controverted that the King might change part or the whole of the law or political form of government of a conquered dominion.
Page 535 - As some fierce comet of tremendous size, To which the stars did reverence as it passed, So he, through learning and through fancy took His flight sublime, and on the loftiest top Of fame's dread mountain sat.
Page 20 - A country conquered by the British arms becomes a dominion of the King in the right of his crown, and therefore necessarily subject to the legislative power of the Parliament of Great Britain.
Page 56 - And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons.
Page 534 - Take one example, to our purpose quite. A man of rank, and of capacious soul, Who riches had and fame, beyond desire, An heir of flattery, to titles born, And reputation and luxurious life : Yet not content with ancestorial name, Or to be known because his fathers were, He on this height hereditary stood, And, gazing higher, purposed in his heart To take another step.
Page 589 - Is beauty, curtain'd from the sight Of the gross world, illumining One only mansion with her light ! Unseen by man's disturbing eye, — The flower, that blooms beneath the sea Too deep for sunbeams, doth not lie Hid in more chaste obscurity ! So, Hinda, have thy face and mind, Like holy mysteries, lain enshrined.
Page 447 - That, through a determined and persevering, but, at tha same time, judicious and temperate enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of his Majesty's subjects.

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