Publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Volume 1

Front Cover
The Society, 1895 - Local history
0 Reviews
Primarily consists of: Transactions, v. 1, 3, 5-8, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, 32, 34-35, 38, 42-43; and: Collections, v. 2, 4, 9, 15-16, 22-23, 29-31, 33, 36-37, 39-41; also includes lists of members.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 131 - FOR, behold, the Lord, the Lord of hosts, Doth take away from Jerusalem and from Judah the stay and the staff, The whole stay of bread, and the whole stay of water, The mighty man, and the man of war, The judge, and the prophet, and the prudent, and the ancient, The captain of fifty, and the honourable man, And the counsellor, and the cunning artificer, and the eloquent orator.
Page 52 - The celebration of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of the Jews in the United States properly emphasizes a series of historical facts of more than merely national significance.
Page 240 - AN INCESSANT ATTENTION TO PRESERVE INVIOLATE THOSE EXALTED RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES OF HUMAN NATURE FOR WHICH THEY HAVE FOUGHT AND BLED AND WITHOUT WHICH THE HIGH RANK OF A RATIONAL BEING IS A CURSE INSTEAD OF A BLESSING.
Page 240 - ... inviolate those exalted rights and liberties of human nature for which they have fought and bled, and without which the high rank of a rational being is a curse instead of a blessing. An unalterable determination to promote and cherish, between the respective states, that union and national honor so essentially necessary to their happiness and the future dignity of the American empire.
Page 167 - You have the Pyrrhic dance as yet, Where is the Pyrrhic phalanx gone? Of two such lessons, why forget The nobler and the manlier one?
Page 65 - To commemorate that train of events which led to the American Revolution and finally secured Liberty and Independence to the United States.
Page 64 - Boston, for the purpose of establishing and perpetuating a library of the religious history and litera- • ture of New England, and for the erection of a suitable building for the accommodation of the same, and for the use of charitable societies...
Page 398 - My fathers and brethren, this is never to be forgotten, that New England is originally a plantation of religion, not a plantation of trade.
Page 240 - Cincinnatus, and being resolved to follow his Example by returning to their Citizenship, they think they may with Propriety denominate themselves The Society of the Cincinnati.
Page 425 - before the Honorable House of Representatives, on the Day intended for the Choice of Counsellors, Agreeable to the Advice of the Continental Congress,

Bibliographic information