Voices of Revolution: The Dissident Press in America

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Columbia University Press, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 335 pages
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Few aspects of American military history have been as vigorously debated as Harry Truman's decision to use atomic bombs against Japan. In this carefully crafted volume, Michael Kort describes the wartime circumstances and thinking that form the context for the decision to use these weapons, surveys the major debates related to that decision, and provides a comprehensive collection of key primary source documents that illuminate the behavior of the United States and Japan during the closing days of World War II.

Kort opens with a summary of the debate over Hiroshima as it has evolved since 1945. He then provides a historical overview of thye events in question, beginning with the decision and program to build the atomic bomb. Detailing the sequence of events leading to Japan's surrender, he revisits the decisive battles of the Pacific War and the motivations of American and Japanese leaders. Finally, Kort examines ten key issues in the discussion of Hiroshima and guides readers to relevant primary source documents, scholarly books, and articles.

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User Review  - beau.p.laurence - LibraryThing

subtitled "The Dissident Press in America" each chapter is dedicated to someone who spoke the truth (and generally paid the price). my s/heroes, including William Lloyd Garrison, Margaret Sanger, Julius Wayland (The Appeal to Reason editor) Read full review

Voices of revolution: the dissident press in America

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Streitmatter (Mightier Than the Sword: How the News Media Have Shaped American History) presents 14 case studies that examine the effect that dissent or alternative periodicals had on American society ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Edward D. berkowitz is professor of history and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. He is the author of eight books and the editor of three collections. During the seventies he served as a staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda, helping President Carter plan for a second term that never came to be.

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