Mrs. Ellis's Housekeeping Made Easy, Or, Complete Instructor in All Branches of Cookery and Domestic Economy : Containing the Most Modern and Approved Receipts of Daily Service in All Families

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Burgess, Stringer, 1843 - Cookery, American - 108 pages
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Recipes, tips on medical home remedies, and cleaning hints for the woman at home.
 

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Page 106 - To prevent the Smoking of a Lamp. — Soak the wick in strong vinegar, and dry it well before you use it ; it will then burn both sweet and pleasant, and give much satisfaction for the trifling trouble in preparing it.
Page 16 - TO BROIL A SHAD. Split and wash the shad, and afterwards dry it in a cloth. Season it with salt and pepper. Have ready a bed of clear bright coals. Grease your gridiron well, and as soon as it is hot lay the shad upon it, and broil it for about a. quarter of an hour or more, according to the thickness. Butter it well, and send it to table. You may serve with it melted butter in a sauce-boat. Or you may cut it into three pieces and broil it without splitting. It will then, of course, require a longer...
Page 36 - The beauty of a poached egg is for the yolk to be seen blushing through the white, which should only be just sufficiently hardened to form a transparent veil for the egg.
Page 25 - Chicken Salad. — Boil a chicken that weighs not more than a pound and a half. When very tender, take it up, cut it in small strips ; then take six or seven fine white heads of celery, scrape and wash...
Page 34 - Boil them about three quarters of an hour, or till quits tender. When done, drain and squeeze them well till you have pressed out all the water; mash them with a little butter, pepper and salt. Then put the squash thus prepared into a stewpan, set it on hot coals, and stir it very frequently till it becomes dry.
Page 24 - Venison :, current jelly warmed ; or half a pint of red wine, with a quarter of a pound of sugar, simmered over a clear fire for five or six minutes ; or half a pint of vinegar, and a quarter of a pound of sugar, simmered to syrup.
Page 31 - ... may be repeated as often as liquor is found. The quantity will be about six quarts. When done, let it be simmered in an iron boiler as long as any scum arises ; then bruise a quarter of a pound of ginger, a quarter of a pound of allspice, two ounces of long pepper, two ounces of cloves...
Page 102 - WATER-PROOF. Mix a pint of drying oil, two ounces of yellow wax, two ounces of turpentine. and half an ounce of Burgundy pitch, carefully over a slow - fire. Lay the mixture, whilst hot, on the boots or shoes...
Page 102 - To half a pint of milk put an equal quantity of vinegar, in order to curdle it ; then separate the curd from the whey, and mix the whey with the whites of four or five eggs, beating the whole well together.
Page 19 - ... or when you take it up put a slice under it, which will enable you to place it on the dish entire ; put it into a soup-pot or deep stew-pan, with cold water enough to cover it, and a quart over ; set it on a quick fire to get the scum up, which remove as it rises ; then put in two carrots...

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