Chief Contemporary Dramatists: Twenty Plays from the Recent Drama of England, Ireland, America, Germany, France, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, and Russia

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Thomas Herbert Dickinson
Houghton Mifflin, 1915 - Drama - 676 pages
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Page 201 - To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite; To forgive wrongs darker than death or night; To defy Power, which seems omnipotent; To love, and bear; to hope till Hope creates From its own wreck the thing it contemplates; Neither to change, nor falter, nor repent; This, like thy glory, Titan, is to be Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free; This is alone Life, Joy, Empire, and Victory.
Page 223 - I'll have no call now to be up crying and praying when the wind breaks from the south, and you can hear the surf is in the east, and the surf is in the west, making a great stir with the two noises, and they hitting one on the other. I'll have no call now to be going down and getting Holy Water in the dark nights after Samhain, and I won't care what way the sea is when the other women will be keening.
Page 223 - They're all gone now, and there isn't anything more the sea can do to me. . . . I'll have no call now to be up crying and praying when the wind breaks from the south, and you can hear the surf is in the east, and the surf is in the west, making a great stir with the two noises, and they hitting one on the other.
Page 220 - If it was a hundred horses, or a thousand horses you had itself, what is the price of a thousand horses against a son where there is one son only?
Page 219 - NORA He'll not stop him, mother, and I heard Eamon Simon and Stephen Pheety and Colum Shawn saying he would go. MAURYA Where is he itself? NORA He went down to see would there be another boat sailing in the week, and I'm thinking it won't be long till he's here now, for the tide's turning at the green head, and the hooker's tacking from the east.
Page 224 - Hartley's feet. They're all together this time, and the end is come. May the Almighty God have mercy on Bartley's soul, and on Michael's soul, and on the souls of Sheamus and Patch, and Stephen and Shawn (bending her head) ; and may He have mercy on my soul, Nora, and on the soul of every one is left living in the world.
Page 222 - I've seen the fearfulest thing any person has seen, since the day Bride Dara seen the dead man with the child in his arms. CATHLEEN AND NORA. Uah. (They crouch down in front of the old woman at the fire.) NORA. Tell us what it is you seen. MAURYA. I went down to the spring well, and I stood there saying a prayer to myself.
Page 219 - I'll put them up in the turf-loft, the way she won't know of them at all, and maybe when the tide turns she'll be going down to see would he be floating from the east. They put the ladder against the gable of the chimney; Cathleen goes up a few steps and hides the bundle in the turf-loft.
Page 221 - NORA Giving her a knife. I've heard tell it was a long way to Donegal. CATHLEEN Cutting the string. It is surely. There was a man in here a while ago — the man sold us that knife — and he said if you set off walking from the rocks beyond, it would be seven days you'd be in Donegal.
Page 22 - No, we are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

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