History of Charles the first and the English revolution, tr. by A.R. Scoble

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Page 334 - May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and I humbly beg your majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me.
Page 353 - As to the militia, I thought so much of it before I sent that answer, and am so much assured that the answer is agreeable to what in justice or reason you can ask, or I in honour grant, that I shall not alter it in any point. For my residence near you, I wish it might be so safe and honourable, that I had no cause to absent myself from Whitehall: ask yourselves whether I have not.
Page 208 - I pray God bless him to carry it so that the Church may have honour, and the State service and content by it. And now, if the Church will not hold up themselves, under God I can do no more.
Page 296 - I have nigh done! One stroke will make my wife a widow, my dear children fatherless, deprive my poor servants of their indulgent master, and separate me from my affectionate brother and all my friends! But let God be to you and them all in all!
Page 355 - Ireland will never be done in the way that you are in ; four hundred will never do that work. It must be put into the hands of one. If I were trusted with it, I would pawn my head to end that work. And, though I am a beggar myself, yet/' speaking with a strong asseveration,
Page 334 - I am sorry for this occasion of coming unto you. Yesterday I sent a sergeant-atarms upon a very important occasion, to apprehend some that, by my command, were accused of high treason : whereunto I did expect obedience, and not a message.
Page 334 - For I must tell you Gentlemen, that so long as these persons that I have accused (for no slight Crime but for Treason) are here, I cannot expect that this House will be in the Right way that I do heartily wish it: Therefore I am come to tell you that I must have them wheresoever I find them.
Page 166 - We must now speak, or for ever hold our peace; for us to be silent, when king and kingdom are in this calamity, is not fit.
Page 156 - The lord keeper, by the king's direction, subjoined, "This way of parliamentary supplies, as his majesty told you, he hath chosen, not as the only way, but as the fittest ; not because he is destitute of others, but because it is most agreeable to the goodness of his own most gracious disposition, and to the desire and weal of his people. If this be deferred, necessity and the sword of the enemy make way for the others. Remember his majesty's admonition; I say, remember it4.
Page 378 - If blood once begin to touch blood, we shall presently fall into a certain misery, and must attend an uncertain success, God knows when, and God knows what. Every man here is bound in conscience to employ his...

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