The flower garden, its arrangement, cultivation and general management, abridged and corrected from the larger work [by J. Rennie] by G. Glenny

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1852
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Page 125 - ... quantity of happiness produced by a particle of wealth (each particle being of the same magnitude) will be less and less at every particle; the second will produce less than the first, the third less than the second and so on".
Page 44 - The foundations should consist of mounds of earth, which answer the purpose as well as any more solid erection, and will make the stones go farther. Rocks of the same kind and colour should be placed together; if intermixed, they seldom wear a natural appearance. A dark cave, penetrating into the thickest part of the erection, is not very difficult to construct; and when encircled with ivy, and inhabited by a pair of horned owls," alive of course, "which may bo easily procured, it will form a most...
Page 18 - ... moss-buds, minute though they be, they never advance farther than the bud, and die with the first dry weather which occurs, leaving their remains to rot, and form the first particles of true vegetable soil. As soon as a thin layer of soil is thus formed, a crop of lichens make their appearance, and go through the same process of growth and decay ; and if other circumstances are favourable, the soil soon accumulates to a sufficient depth for grass and other plants which can grow in little earth....
Page 114 - I raised from the natural seed of one umbel of a highly-manured red cowslip, a primrose, a cowslip, oxlips of the usual and other colours, a black polyanthus, a hose-in-hose cowslip, and a natural primrose bearing its flower on a polyanthus stalk. From the seed of that very hose-in-hose cowslip I have since raised a hose-in-hose primrose. I therefore consider all these to be only local varieties depending upon soil and situation *." Professor Henslow, of Cambridge, has since confirmed this experiment...
Page 154 - I thin off most of the large roots, yet retain as many of the fine fibrous ones as possible. I likewise, at the same time, cut down all the former year's shoots, retaining only two, three, or four eyes on each, according to the strength and age of the plants.
Page 62 - Yellow, red, and blue, are contrasts in all their shades, and the harmonizing tints are discovered by the union of two of them. These colours have different qualities : blue is of a cold and unassuming nature, yellow illuminates, and red warms.
Page 144 - The runners when taken off should be planted isv mould, or loam and peat without any manure, at the foot of a south wall, in rows six inches apart, and four inches from plant to plant in the rows. They will soon strike root, and be ready about the end of July for removal to any part of the garden where the soil is light They may...
Page 18 - As at this stage there is almost no support for these tiny moss-buds, minute though they be, they never advance farther than the bud, and die with the first dry weather which occurs, leaving their remains to rot, and form the first particles of true vegetable soil. As soon as a thin layer of soil is thus formed, a crop of lichens make their appearance, and go through the same process of growth and decay ; and if other circumstances are favourable, the soil soon accumulates to a sufficient depth for...
Page 18 - In instances where successive generations of vegetables have grown upon a soil, unless part of their produce has been carried off by man, or consumed by animals, the vegetable matter increases in such a proportion that the soil approaches to a peat in its nature ; and if in a situation where it can receive water from a higher district, it becomes spongy, and permeated with that fluid, and is gradually rendered incapable of supporting the nobler classes of vegetables.
Page 128 - I watered them freely with the pipe of the water' pot between the rows, when the pods were swelling ' and showing bloom ; for if the plants lack moisture ' at this stage of their growth, when the weather is ' generally hot and the ground dry, the flowers seem ' to languish, and never attain that degree of perfec' tion they would do if the beds were kept moist and

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