What is a Human Being?: A Heideggerian View

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 28, 1995 - Philosophy - 262 pages
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This broad, ambitious study is about human nature--treated in a way quite different from the scientific account that influences so much of contemporary philosophy. Drawing on certain basic ideas of Heidegger, the author presents an alternative to the debate waged between dualists and materialists in the philosophy of mind that involves reconceiving the way we usually think about "mental" life. Olafson argues that familiar contrasts between the "physical" and the "psychological" break down under closer scrutiny. They need to be replaced by a conception of human being in which we are not entities compounded out of body and mind, but unitary entities that are distinguished by "having a world," which is very different from simply being a part of the world.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Inside and outside
16
Perception as presence
46
Presence and absence
87
Individuation
132
Polarity and agency
165
Bodies
198
The entity each of us is
227
Conclusion
254
Index
257
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