Beecher's Recitations and Readings: Humorous, Serious, Dramatic, Including Prose and Poetical Selections in Dutch, French, Yankee, Irish, Backwoods, Negro, and Other Dialects

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Alvah C. Beecher
Dick & Fitzgerald, 1874 - Elocution - 180 pages
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Page 77 - Do ye hear the children weeping, O my brothers, Ere the sorrow comes with years? They are leaning their young heads against their mothers, And that cannot stop their tears. The young lambs are bleating in the meadows, The young birds are chirping in the nest, The young fawns are playing with the shadows, The young flowers are blowing toward the west — But the young, young children, O my brothers, They are weeping bitterly! They are weeping in the playtime of the others, In the country of the free.
Page 136 - He got him up so in the matter of catching flies, and kept him in practice so constant, that he'd nail a fly every time as far as he could see him. Smiley said all a frog wanted was education, and he could do most anything— and I believe him. Why, I've seen him set Dan'l Webster down here on this floor— Dan'l Webster was the name of the frog— and sing out, "Flies, Dan'l, flies!
Page 43 - I die, my friend," quoth I, And "Exactly so," quoth he. 'Says he, "Dear JAMES, to murder me Were a foolish thing to do, For don't you see that you can't cook me, While I can — and will — cook you...
Page 137 - I don't see no p'ints about that frog that's any better'n any other frog.' "'Maybe you don't/ Smiley says. 'Maybe you understand frogs and maybe you don't understand 'em; maybe you've had experience, and maybe you ain't only a amature, as it were. Anyways, I've got my opinion, and I'll resk forty dollars that he can outjump any frog in Calaveras County.
Page 99 - twas a gallant thing to see that crowning show: Valor and love, and a king above, and the royal beasts below. Ramped and roared the lions, with horrid laughing jaws; They bit, they glared, gave blows like beams, a wind went with their paws ; With wallowing might and stifled roar they rolled on one another.
Page 137 - I'm only a stranger here, and I ain't got no frog; but if I had a frog, I'd bet you." And then Smiley says, "That's all right—that's all right— if you'll hold my box a minute, I'll go and get you a frog.
Page 42 - Oh elderly man, it's little I know Of the duties of men of the sea, And I'll eat my hand if I understand How you can possibly be 'At once a cook, and a captain bold, And the mate of the Nancy brig, And a bo'sun tight, and a midshipmite, And the crew of the captain's gig.
Page 169 - To supper at last the farmer goes. The apples are pared, the paper read, The stories are told, then all to bed. Without, the crickets' ceaseless song Makes shrill the silence all night long ; The heavy dews are falling. The housewife's hand has turned the lock ; Drowsily ticks the kitchen clock ; The household sinks to deep repose, But still in sleep the farm-boy goes Singing, calling — "Co', boss! co', boss! co'!
Page 135 - Any way that suited the other man would suit him — any way just so's he got a bet, he was satisfied. But still he was lucky, uncommon lucky; he most always come out winner. He was always ready and laying for a chance; there couldn't be no solit'ry thing mentioned but that feller'd offer to bet on it, and take ary side you please, as I was just telling you.
Page 136 - I've seen him set Dan'l Webster down here on this floor — Dan'l Webster was the name of the frog — and sing out, ''Flies, Dan'l, flies...

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