Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania

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Vols.for 1878,1879,1881,1884 contain "List of fellows and members."
 

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Page 242 - ... journey was obliged to leave his party, in pursuit of a native guide who had decamped with a gun. In mentioning this incident, Mr Cay writes (25th March 1845) : " I was rather cold that night, as I had come off after him in my shirt-sleeves ; moreover, I had no dinner, but I got plenty of lerp. Lerp is very sweet, and is formed by an insect on the leaves of gum-trees ; in size and appearance like a flake of snow, it feels like matted wool, and tastes like the ice on a wedding-cake.
Page 336 - ... Scarborough shales. Several of those genera are common both to the carboniferous and oolitic periods, but the most abundant and characteristic plants of the Australian beds belong to a genus (Glossopteris) never found in the old coal-fields, but several species of which are, on the other hand, well-known in coal-beds of the oolitic age in various parts of the world. I am therefore strongly of opinion, from the evidence of more than double the number of species of plants known before, that the...
Page 190 - ... 50, and are called Aquinas by the wild Indians of that part ; the Chilotan Indians have a different name for them. Professor Henslow, who has examined the dried specimens which I brought home, says that they are the same with those described by Mr. Sabine from Valparaiso, but that they form a variety which by some botanists has been considered as specifically distinct. It is remarkable that the same plant should be found on the sterile mountains of central Chili, where a drop of rain does not...
Page 189 - ... inches in diameter. They resembled in every respect and had the same smell as English potatoes ; but when boiled they shrunk much and were watery and insipid, without any bitter taste. They are undoubtedly here indigenous. They grow as far south, according to Mr. Low, as latitude 50, and are called Aquinas by the wild Indians of that part.
Page 335 - Pachydomus globosu? seem to rest on a sandstone containing remains of plants, and which is known to belong to the top of the coal series : Count Strzelecki, who made this observation, doubts its correctness himself, and expressly states that it needs re-examination to establish the fact of those Pachydomus clays really existing in this position. Nevertheless the inference has been drawn from this observation, that the Jerusalem coal-basin was much older than that at Newcastle...
Page 190 - Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia: of the commodities there found and to be raysed, as well...
Page 335 - Having far exceeded the limits I had originally intended for the preceding part of this paper, I find it only possible to give a brief outline of those general topics on which I intended to nave dwelt.
Page 321 - ... from which it differs in its small, short glabella, smooth eyes, want of cephalothoracic furrows, &c. Having now examined numerous specimens of the Australian species, there can be no longer any doubt of the distinctness of the group from Phillipsia from the characters of the cephalothorax, and the pygidium is still more distinct. From those materials I have therefore drawn up the above characters, which it is believed will distinguish them easily from the other generic types.
Page 337 - Ireland, that it is impossible not to believe them to be nearly on the same parallel, and there is equal difficulty in imagining them to be either younger or older than those deposits. Of those species no less than eleven are believed to be positively identical, on the most careful comparison of the Australian and Irish specimens, and nine more are so closely allied that it has been found impossible to detect any difference of character, but which, either from imperfect preservation or want of sufficient...
Page 191 - ... is thicke, fat, and tuberous, not much differing either in shape, colour or taste from the common potatoes, saving that the roots hereof are not so great nor long; some of them are as round as a ball, some...

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