The History of Christianity in India: From the Commencement of the Christian Era, Volume 1

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R.B. Seeley and W. Burnside, 1839 - Christianity
 

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Contents

Is compelled to return
12
Opens a communication by sea with India and his dominions
13
Extent of Alexanders projects
14
Division of his empire between four of his officers
15
Ptolemy Soter king of Egypt prosecutes his commercial designs
18
Christians welcome him
21
Hippalus opens a direct communication with India across the Ara
24
CHAPTER II
30
Probable origin of the tradition about him
40
Probable account of the early origin of the Indian church through
47
Constantino the Great established Christianity as the religion of
53
Signature of Johannes at the council of Nice accounted for
61
CHAPTER III
69
His violent proceedings to extirpate heresy
75
The progress of his sect and degeneracy of his tenets
82
CHAPTER IV
89
Origin of Malabar rise of Ceram Peroumal a powerful rajah
97
Their Charters on copperplates lost by the Portuguese
104
Church of India episcopal Dissertation on Episcopacy
110
The Christians good character inferred from the peace and pros
116
ambition of Europe
122
Mahomedans take Constantinople and expel the Genoese
123
Portuguese under Vasco de Gama discover the passage to India by way of the Cape of Good Hope They are soon obliged to return but subsequently ...
124
CHAPTER II
127
that of Britain proved
128
Mission of Augustine the monk to Britain
129
Justinian acknowledges the Popes supremacy in 533
133
its assumption favoured by circumstances
134
Former Bishops of Rome confined their attention to ecclesiastical affairs
136
Influence of the priesthood increases in the middle ages
137
Roman empire divided into ten kingdoms
138
This favours the Popes pretensions
139
His arrogance condemned by Roman writers 189
140
Other iniquitous means used to support the papal pretensions
144
dawn of Reformation Inquisition established to extinguish it
146
two popes at same time
148
John Wicliff the English reformer
149
Roman church seeks to extend her dominion in the eastern and western worlds newly discovered
150
Reflections relating to the Syrian church in India
151
brings home two Indian Christians
152
place themselves under his protection
158
History of Ignatius Loyola
159
Rise of the order of Jesuits
160
Xaviers birth parentage and education
165
Enters upon the work and discipline of his new calling
167
Is called to labour at Rome
168
Appointed to the Indian mission
169
His departure for India
171
Arrival at Goa and exertions there
173
Foundation of the college of St Paul at Goa and of a seminary for orphans
174
His first visit to the southern coast
175
Specimen of his mode of instruction
177
Returns to Goa with some youths for education his second visit to the south
180
Invasion of the BadagesXavier succours the Paravars
181
His preaching and success in Travancore
182
Frightens an army of Badages out of the country
183
General impression in favour of Christianity
184
His third visit to the south
186
His converts at Manaar cruelly persecuted
188
His singular expedient to convert a libertine
189
His voyage to the eastern isles and successes there
191
His hazardous mission to the isles of Del Moro
192
Narrow escape at Java
195
More missionaries arrive
196
History of the first convert of Japan
197
Xaviers arrangements and instructions for the southern congrega tions
198
visits Ramisseram
199
Returns to Goa Baptism of three Japonese
200
Xavier writes to the king of Portugal
201
Mar Abraham a new prelate arrives from Babylon
253
Mar Joseph arrives at Goa his dissimulation detected
254
Is permitted to return to Malabar which creates a schism in the diocese
255
Abraham is appre hended and shipped for Europe but escapes to Mosul
256
Is reoretained and sent back to India as Bishop of Angamale
259
Natives testimony to the same effect and their resolution to expel
268
CHAPTER VII
275
Returns to Malabar but continues to use the Syrian ritual
281
Romanistsaccusations against him
291
In the fifteenth century the Florentines are admitted to a share
298
Menezes demands the Archdeacons implicit submission
304
Archdeacon makes a private confession of faith to a Franciscan
311
COMPARATIVE VIEW OF THE SYRIANS AND PORTUGUESE IN INDIA
317
CHAPTER II
333
Syrian Archdeacon meets him with a strong escort at Cochin
340
Portuguese remonstrance against his violence disregarded
349
Interview with an aged Cattanar at Mangate
358
CHAPTER III
364
from interfering with each other
372
At Canhur they separate
373
Archbishop proceeds to the South
374
At Porca he receives a friendly visit from the Rajah
375
Violates his agreement with the Archdeacon
377
Treacherously designs the destruction of a fort at Coulan
378
Visit to Molandurte where he again violates his agreement with the Archdeacon
381
CHAPTER IV
383
He resolves to hold an ordination at Diamperattempts ineffectu ally made to prevent it
384
Thirtyeight candidates ordained
391
Hostile disposition of the Naires towards him at Mangalan
392
Arrival at Carturteperforms divine service
393
Tries the effect of pomp and music which at first give general dissatisfaction as also his interference with their offerings and services
394
Introduces auricular confession
395
Opposed by a Cattanar at the head of a band of men
396
The Rannee orders him to depart
397
He dissembles with her and bribes her officers to protect and assist him
399
Celebrates PassionWeek with great pomp and the various popish ceremonies
402
Adoration of the cross
403
Several cattanars conclude to join him
404
Attempts to depose the Archdeacona conference first proposed
408
Holds a second ordinationreceives a visit from Francisco Roz
409
Intended interruption defeated F Roz preaches
411
Syrians feast of Charitydissertation on the practice
413
Menezes visits and relieves the sick
419
Favourable reception at Nagpili
420
CHAPTER V
423
The inhabitants reconciled to the Church of Rome
425
Archdeacon still holds out
426
Menezes affected forbearance Specimen of his knowledge of Scripture
427
His second visit to Diamperhis violence of temper
429
Private interview with the prime minister of Cochin
433
Contrasts his own charity with the parsimony of the Syrian Bishops
434
Archdeacon alarmed at his progress and doubtful how to act
435
Menezes endeavours to frighten him into submission
436
Finds the people of Narame in arms to resist him applies to the heathen governor for assistance the place abandoned
438
Receives a submissive letter from the Archdeacon
439
Sends him ten articles to subscribehis ignorance of ecclesiastical history
440
Assumption of Roman supremacyBaronius perversion of Cypri ans sentiments
443
Menezes allows the Archdeacon twenty days to consider the articles
446
His confidence in the Rajah soon shaken
447
Suspects the Mangate Rajah of preventing the Archdeacons sub missionthreatens him
448
Overcomes the Cochin Rajah by his violence and insolence
449
Inconsistency of his behaviour with the character of a Christian and the office of a Bishop
455
At the Rajahs command the Archdeacon submits and subscribes Articles in private
456
It is determined to hold the Synod at Diamper
459
Both parties issue summonses to their respective flocks to attend
460
Menezes finishes the decrees for the Synod
461
Father Simons candid remarks on his conduct
462
CHAPTER VI
464

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Page 4 - And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven, as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire ; and it sat upon each of them, and they were all filled with the Holy Ghost ; and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance.
Page 21 - And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:) To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.
Page 146 - The visible church of Christ is a congregation of faithful men, in the which the pure Word of God is preached, and the sacraments be duly ministered according to Christ's ordinance in all those things that of necessity are requisite to the same.
Page 67 - By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter; choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season...
Page 416 - Let the elders that rule well be counted worthy of double honour, especially they who labour in the word and doctrine.
Page 22 - Remember the former things of old : for I am God, and there is none else ; I am God, and there is none like me, declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, " My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure...
Page 290 - I will send him against an hypocritical nation, and against the people of my wrath will I give him a charge, to take the spoil, and to take the prey, and to tread them down like the mire of the streets.
Page 343 - Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that entereth not by the door into the sheepfold, but climbeth up some other way, the same is a thief and a robber.
Page 475 - For if the casting away of them be the reconciling of the world, what shall the receiving of them be, but life from the dead...
Page 23 - Verily, verily, I say unto thee, We speak that we do know, and testify that we have seen ; and ye receive not our witness. If I have told you earthly things, and ye believe not, how shall ye believe, if I tell you of heavenly things?

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