Mansex Fine: Religion, Manliness and Imperialism in Nineteenth-century British Culture

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Manchester University Press, 1998 - History - 207 pages
Mansex fine interrogates the ideological relations between religion, gender and nation in nineteenth-century Britain. In a wide-ranging account which incorporates analyses of writers as diverse as Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Kingsley, J. H. Newman, Hopkins and Wilde, David Alderson provides illuminating discussions of the ways in which manliness came to be defined against both Catholicism and revolution, fed more generally into British imperial culture, and, in particular, became integral to colonial perceptions of Ireland. The tensions between manliness and male same-sex desire in this context are also a consistent theme of the book. Mansex fine will be welcomed by advanced undergraduates, postgraduates and a general academic readership interested in nineteenth-century culture, gender/gay studies and imperial ideology.
 

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Contents

The thin end of the wedge Punch 1850page
8
Manly freedom15
15
Alton Locke
46
3
71
Hopkins body and sexuality139
139
Conclusion168
168
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About the author (1998)

David Alderson is Lecturer in Literary Studies at Staffordshire University.

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