A Journal of the First Voyage of Vasco Da Gama, 1497-1499

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Hakluyt Society, 1898 - Africa - 250 pages
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Page 113 - From a message which has now been brought to this city by one of the captains, we learn that they did reach and discover India and other kingdoms and lordships bordering upon it; that they entered and navigated its sea, finding large cities, large edifices and rivers, and great populations, among whom is carried on all the trade in spices and precious stones, which are forwarded in ships ... to Mecca, and thence to Cairo, whence they are dispersed throughout the world.
Page 114 - ... be diverted to the natives and ships of our own kingdom, so that henceforth all Christendom, in this part of Europe, shall be able, in a large measure, to provide itself with these spices and precious stones.
Page 52 - Calecut) they took us to a large church, and this is what we saw : — The body of the church is as large as a monastery, all built of hewn stone and covered with tiles. At the main entrance rises a pillar of bronze as high as a mast, on the top of which was perched a bird, apparently a cock. In addition to this, there was another pillar as high as a man, and very stout. In the centre of the body of the church rose a chapel, all built of hewn stone, with a bronze door sufficiently wide for a man...
Page 114 - Most high and excellent Prince and Princess, most potent Lord and Lady! Your Highnesses already know that we had ordered Vasco da Gama, a nobleman of our household, and his brother Paulo da Gama, with four vessels to make discoveries by sea, and that two years have now elapsed since their departure. And as the principal motive of this enterprise has been, with our predecessors...
Page 265 - ... and translations of the Elizabethan and Stuart periods, are admirable examples of English prose at the stage of its most robust development. The Society has not confined its selection to the books of English travellers, to a particular age, or to particular regions. Where the original is foreign, the work is given in English, either a fresh translation being made, or an earlier rendering, accurate as well as attractive, being utilized.
Page 274 - Life membership may be obtained by a single subscription of ten pounds or more. 3. Each member of the Society, having paid his subscription, shall be entitled to a copy of every work produced by the Society within the period subscribed for, and to vote at the General Meetings. 4. A General Meeting of the subscribers shall be held annually within the first three months of the year.
Page 36 - ... guarded by a doorkeeper with a drawn cutlass. The king received them hospitably, and ordered that they should be shown over the city. They stopped on their way at the house of two Christian merchants, who showed them a paper...
Page 274 - Secretary, and seventeen ordinary members, to be elected annually ; but vacancies occurring between the general meetings shall be filled up by the Council. V. A General Meeting of the Subscribers shall be held annually. The Secretary's Report on the condition and proceedings of the Society shall be then read, and the meeting shall proceed to elect the Council for the ensuing year. VI. At each Annual Election, three of the old Council shall retire. VII. The Council shall meet when necessary for the...
Page 55 - The further we advanced in the direction of the king's palace, the more did they increase in number. And when we arrived there, men of much distinction and great lords came out to meet the captain, and joined those who were already in attendance upon him. It was then an hour before sunset. When we reached the palace we passed through a gate into a courtyard of great size, and before we arrived at where the king was, we passed four doors, through which we had to force our way, giving many blows to...
Page 60 - Moor, his factor, and of the bale, the captain informed them of his intention. They came, and when they saw the present they laughed at it, saying that it was not a thing to offer to a king, that the poorest merchant from Mecca, or any other part of India, gave more, and that if he wanted to make a present it should be in gold, as the king would not accept such things.

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