Unwrapping the Pharaohs: How Egyptian Archaeology Confirms the Biblical Timeline

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Master Books, 2006 - Religion - 218 pages
21 Reviews
Mummies, pyramids, and pharaohs - oh my! The culture and civilization of the ancient Egyptians have fascinated people for centuries. However, in recent years, liberal teachers and professors have used the traditional Egyptian chronology to undermine the truth of the biblical record in Exodus. Authors David Down and John Ashton present a groundbreaking new chronology in Unwrapping the Pharaohs that supports the biblical account. Go back in time as famous Egyptians such as the boy-king Tutankhamen, the female pharaoh Hatshepsut, and the beautiful Cleopatra are brought to life. Learn who the pharaoh of the Exodus was and where his pyramid is in this captivating new look at Egyptian history. Gives a new chronology, which confirms the old testament accounts of moses, the exodus, and Joseph. Fascinating facts about ancient egyptian civilization and life. Complete with over 300 beautiful full-color photographs. Book jacket.

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Review: Unwrapping the Pharaohs: How Egyptian Archaeology Confirms the Biblical Timeline [With DVD]

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

While this is intriguing to think about, frankly Egypt's history is just so fractured in some places, that it will remain almost impossible to confirm the text's theory. Read full review

Review: Unwrapping the Pharaohs: How Egyptian Archaeology Confirms the Biblical Timeline [With DVD]

User Review  - Goodreads

While this is intriguing to think about, frankly Egypt's history is just so fractured in some places, that it will remain almost impossible to confirm the text's theory. Read full review

About the author (2006)

David Down has experienced the wonders of archaeological discoveries in Egypt, the Middle East and Israel for over 48 years. David shares his latest discoveries in a monthly archaeology journal called "Diggings," and a bi-monthly magazine called "Archaeological Diggings" produced and distributed in the United States.

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