American Versus English Methods of Bridge Designing

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1886 - Bridges - 64 pages
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A controversy, between J.A.L. Waddell and others, provoked by a review of his "System of iron railroad bridges for Japan."
 

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Page 8 - The several pieces forming one built member must fit closely together, and when riveted shall be free from twists, bends, or open joints.
Page 33 - In the present day engineers of all countries are in accord as to the principles of estimating the magnitude of the stresses on the different members of a structure, but not so in proportioning the members to resist those stresses. The practical result is, that a bridge which would be passed by the English Board of Trade would require to be strengthened five per cent in some parts and fifty per cent in others before it would be accepted by the German Government, or by any of the leading railway companies...
Page 27 - And every fair demeanor, an example : Titles of honour add not to his worth, Who is himself an honour to his titles.
Page 37 - ... structure. Further than this, the shape of material used in designing on these systems is such that proper grades of iron are readily attainable. The riveted system has, of necessity, so many imperfections of design, of workmanship and material, in contrast with the above, that, to obtain any thing approaching equal strength on the same specification, it should only be used with a higher factor of safety. It is probable that this difference is not less than 20 per cent; so that when a pin bridge...
Page 35 - ... JOHN WILEY & SONS. PREFACE. THE system of competitive design, combined with competitive prices, has produced in the United States the most economical and the most serviceable form of a single-span bridge. But there are other forms, such as arches, cantilever-trusses and -arches, and, for the very greatest spans, stiffened-wire suspension-bridges, of which the merits and proper proportions are less generally known, and outside of the United States the question as to the most economical form of...
Page 4 - Illustrations. Second edition. With an additional plate, etc. By JAL Waddell, Member of the Society of Engineers, and Professor in the University of Tokio, Japan. Fifth edition. .. .8vo, cloth, 4 00 " His book is probably the most valuable contribution to the literature of Iron Bridge Building which has yet appeared.
Page 37 - ... to be disposed in the best possible way to concentrate strains at centres of sections, and distribute them in axial lines through the various parts of the structure. Further than this, the shape of material used in designing on these systems is such that proper grades of iron are readily attainable. The riveted system has, of necessity, so many imperfections of design, of workmanship and material, in contrast with the above, that, to obtain any thing approaching equal strength on the same specification,...
Page 61 - A bridge which would be passed by the English Board of Trade would require to be strengthened 5 per cent, in some parts, and 60 per cent, in others, before it would be accepted by the German government, or by any of the leading railway companies in America.
Page 33 - It is an open secret that nearly all the large railway companies are strengthening their bridges, and necessarily so, for I could cite cases where the working stress on the iron has exceeded by 250 per cent, that considered admissible by leading American and German bridge-builders in similar structures.
Page 4 - We strongly recommended this book to students and engineers desirous of learning the art of bridge designing.

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