The Ancient World from the Earliest Times to 800 A.D., Part 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Allyn and Bacon, 1904 - History, Ancient - 610 pages
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Contents

Social classes and government
13
The position of women
18
The industrial arts
19
The fine arts
20
SECTION PAOH
21
Literature and the hieroglyphics
23
Science
24
Religion
25
The idea of immortality
26
Morality
27
The Army
31
THE TIGRISEUPHRATES STATES
37
Society and Culture
43
The king
50
THE MIDDLE STATES
56
the age of the patriarchs
59
Settlement in Canaan the period of the judges
60
Priestly rule
61
Extension of the faith
62
THE PERSIAN EMPIRE 59 The map grows
64
Rise and extent of the Persian empire
65
Religion morals and society
66
Persia and the Scythians
67
the imperial government
68
Post roads
69
A SUMMARY OF ORIENTAL CIVILIZATION 65 The bright side
71
THE GREEKS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY SURVEY I European and Asiatic Types 68 Distinctions in culture
73
Physical differences between Europe and Asia
75
Greece typical of Europe 70 The most European of European lands
76
The Two Early Civilizations in Greece
83
phratry and tribe
89
Dorians and Ionians
95
Colonization of the Aegean SECTION TALK 89 Movements of population in Greece
99
The method of founding colonies
100
Thb Political Revolution 93 The kings overthrown by the chiefs
101
The oligarchies overthrown by the tyrants
102
Early Sparta reforms and growth
104
Classes in Laconia
106
Social institutions
107
The Rise op Democracy at Athens to 500 b c
109
The consolidation of Attica
110
Eupatrid Rule 103 Decline of the Homeric kingship
111
The organization of the Eupatrids Ill 105 Economic oppression
112
Imperfect results attempts at tyranny
113
written laws
114
Solons appointment as Archon to make over the constitution
115
Political reform a 6 c d
116
Additional reforms
117
E The Tyrants 115 Anarchy renewed
118
Expulsion of the son of Peisistratus 510 B c
119
Vigor of free Athens
120
The unfortunate position of the metics or strangers
121
geographical tribes and demes
122
The power of the Assembly greatly enlarged
123
The institution of ostracism
124
Architecture painting and sculpture
127
Lyric poetry
129
Reference list of early poets
130
Philosophy
132
Summary for the Period 1000500 B C
133
THE PERSIAN ATTACK I The Two Antagonists
134
SSCTIOII PAUK 136 Relation to the Ionian revolt I
137
First expedition against Greece 492 b c Mt Athos
138
The moral importance of Marathon
140
Athens from Marathon to Thermopylae 140 Internal faction crushed
141
Themistocles makes Athens a naval power
142
The Persian preparation
143
The Greek preparation
144
Loss of Thessaly
145
The strategy of Themistocles 145
146
Salamis
149
Illustrative incidents after the battle
150
The temptation of Athens
151
Plataea
152
the building of the walls and fortify ing the Peiraeus
154
proposal and failure
156
The growing prominence of Alliens
157
Athens assumes leadership of the Ionian Greeks 47
158
Changes in the character of the Delian League 160 The league develops into an Athenian empire 9 B C
161
The First Period of Strife with Sparta to the Thirty Years Truce 461455 b c
163
Sparta insults Athens an open quarrel
164
Loss of the land empire
168
material political intellectual
169
Relative power compared with other states
170
Main steps in political development
171
The Assembly
172
The waning of the Areopagus
173
State pay for public service
175
The final verdict upon the empire
176
Intellectual and Artistic Athens 181 The true significance of Athens in history
179
The drama
182
Periclespolicy as to theater money
185
18 History
186
Philosophy
187
Education
189
Religion and morality
190
Illustrative extracts
192
limitations a militant civilization and for males only
194
rAOB 192 Causes
196
Resources and plans of the contestants
197
An unforeseen factor the plague in Athens
198
Twentyseven years of war 19
199
New leaders
200
The rule of the Four Hundred 201
200
FROM THE FALL OF ATHENS TO THE FALL OF HELLAS 404338 B C
203
Spartan decay
204
March of the Ten Thousand renewal of the war with Persia
206
A Greek league against Sparta 395 b c
207
Peace of Antalcidas 387 b c
208
Thebes and Athens again make war upon Sparta 209
210
Epamlnondas
211
Anarchy in Greece failure of the citystate
212
its people and king
213
Philips aims and methods
214
RKOTION PACK 215 The Macedonian army
215
Chaeronea congress of Corinth
216
THE GRAECOOKIENTAL WORLD CHAPTER I THE MINGLING OF EAST AND WEST I The Conquests op Alexander ok Macedon 219 The yo...
219
Accession restoration of order
220
Persian campaigns
221
Campaigns in the Far East
223
Results of Alexanders Work 223 Alexanders design to merge East and West in one civilization
224
the many Alexandrias
225
Reaction upon Hellas
227
Summary
228
TO THE ROMAN CONQUEST I The Political Story 227 The wars of the succession 323280 b c
230
The Gallic invasion 278 b c
231
The decline of the Hellenic world
232
Syria
233
Egypt
234
Society 235 General culture
235
Painting and sculpture 23fi
236
Philosophy
237
Libraries and museums universities
239
SECTION PAO
278
Plebeian loss politically
285
BECTION PACK
289
The Licinian Rogations 206
295
the war with Pyrrhus
302
BF CTTON PAOB
304
veto on state action
309
bonds of union 811
311
The reaction of Magna Graecia upon Rome
317
The Roman camp
319
Italy in 264 B c one of five great Mediterranean powers 821
321
The issue at stake
323
The First Punic War The War for Sicilt 360 Occasion
324
Value of the control of the sea
325
Rome becomes a sea power
326
The addition of Sardinia and Corsica
327
The addition of Cisalpine Gaul
328
Occasion
329
Hannibal
330
Hannibals invasion of Italy to Cannae
331
Fidelity of the Latins and Italians to Rome 832
332
Neglect of the sea by Carthage and lack of concerted action by her allies
333
SECTION IAIIE 378 The Scipioa and Hasdrubal in Spain
334
Hannibals forces worn out
335
battle of Zama peace
336
Rome mistress in the West
337
Expansion in the West from 201 to 146 B C
338
Romanization
339
Rome seeks perfidious excuse against Carthage 389
340
Heroic resistance of Carthage
341
the Illyrian pirates the First Macedonian War
343
Syria an ally
344
Rome drawn on to a system of protectorates in the East
345
A gradual process
346
Rearrangements in Greece
347
The Province of Asia
348
Distinction between the Latin West and the Greek East
349
SKOTION PARK 401 Summary of the periods of the Republic
350
Plan of treatment in this chapter
351
Rise of luxury
352
Gladiatorial games
353
Continued decline of the yeomanry after the wars from eco nomic conditions
354
growth of the mob and decay of the consti tution
355
decline of the Senate
356
Growth of Roman insolence toward the subjects
357
Marks of a province
358
The provinces the estates of the Roman people
359
Slavery
360
Extent and brutal character of Roman slavery 860
361
Character of Tiberius
363
Overthrow of the work of the brothers
369
The new civil war
375
A Pompeys Leadership 7859 B C
377
Sertorius in Spain
378
Pompeys second chance Roman expansion in the East
380
Cato Cicero Caesar
381
The conspiracy of Catiline
382
Caesars consulship
383
The rupture between Caesar and Pompey 885
385
Monarchy at Rome inevitable from a corruption at the capital 6 danger on the frontiers
387
Caesar the hope of the subject nationalities
388
B The Civil War 459 Caesar crosses the Rubicon campaign in Italy
389
Campaigns in Spain and Greece Pharsalus 48 b c
390
Caesars policy of clemency and reconciliation 463 His plan for the form of the new monarchy 464 General measures of reform
393
The provinces 466 The unforeseen interruption
394
ottos pie
397
The worship of the dead Augustus
403
The Antonine Caesars
409
SECTION PAGE 490 Marcus Aurelius Antoninus 161180
411
Commodus 180192
412
Table of the emperors
413
the principate
415
The power of the emperors
416
The establishment of the Empire a gradual process
417
B Local Government 500 Municipal institutions
418
The provinces representative assemblies
419
Imperial Defense A The Army 503 Numbers
420
Industrial and disciplinary uses
421
As Augustus corrected them
422
Britain
423
Frontier walls
424
Consequent diffusion of social life
430
E Literature
438
General view of the thirty years
446
Causes of persecution
452
Story of tbe emperors in the West 395455 501
455
Table of prefectures and dioceses
461
BECT105
464
Caesars character and place in history
467
THE EMPIRE OF THE FOURTH CENTURY
471
The senatorial nobility
477
Other and deeper causes of the decay
484
301
486
B The Shine
496
B The Kingdom of the East Goths in Italy
503
Revival of the Empire at Constantinople
507
Clovisconversion motives and political results
511
THE STATE OF WESTERN EUROPE 400800 SECTION PAOB 625 Plan of treatment
516
New causes for decline in cul lure
517
The barbarian conquests accomplished by small numbers
518
Influence of the old populations
519
Summary
520
A The Idea of One Universal Empire
521
Eastern hermits and Western monks
522
Growth of monasticism Organization
523
The vows the monastic life
524
Personality of law
525
Money payment for offenses
526
Summary of Roman and Teutonic ContriButions 644 Contributions from the Roman Empire
527
Contributions from the Teutons
528
restoration of authority over outlying prov
532
The Papacy
538
from Charles
543
THE EMPIRE OF CHARLEMAGNE I Character of Charlemagne SECTION PAOI 667 Charlemagne the man
546
The Prankish state at Charlemagnes accession
547
The winning of the Saxon lands to the Elbe 772804
548
Spain Italy Bavaria
549
Defensive wars against the Eastern Slavs tributary states
550
Revival of the Roman Empire in the West 674 Reasons and pretexts
551
Theory of the Empire
552
The Great Powers in 800
553
Social and Political Conditions 680 General poverty and misery of the times
554
Relations to the church
556
Place of the restored Empire in history
557
Table of Events and Dates
559
A Classified Bibliography
567
Index and Pronouncing VocaBulary
577
393
579
Persia 184
589
Conquest and Revolt of Ionia
592
395
602
Causes for the slowness of the Teutonic conquest
613
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Page 145 - Persians' grave, I could not deem myself a slave. A king sate on the rocky brow Which looks o'er sea-born Salamis ; And ships, by thousands, lay below, And men in nations ; — all were his ! He counted them at break of day — And when the sun set, where were they ? And where are they, and where art thou, My country?
Page 190 - For we are lovers of the beautiful, yet simple in our tastes, and we cultivate the mind without loss of manliness. Wealth we employ, not for talk and ostentation, but when there is a real use for it. (To avow poverty with us is no disgrace ; the true disgrace is in doing nothing to avoid...
Page 36 - My name is Ozymandias, king of kings : Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair ! ' Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away.
Page 42 - THE Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold, And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold; And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea, When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee.
Page 530 - God, a night spent in arms, is of more avail than two months of fasting and prayer; whosoever falls in battle, his sins are forgiven; at the day of judgment his wounds shall be resplendent as vermilion, and odoriferous as musk; and the loss of his limbs shall be supplied by the wings of angels and cherubim.
Page 190 - For in the hour of trial Athens alone among her contemporaries is superior to the report of her. No enemy who comes against her is indignant at the reverses which he sustains at the hands of such a city ; no subject complains that his masters are unworthy of him. And we shall assuredly not be without witnesses ; there are mighty monuments of our power which will make us the wonder of this and of succeeding ages...
Page 190 - To sum up: I say that Athens is the school of Hellas, and that the individual Athenian in his own person seems to have the power of adapting himself to the most varied forms of action with the utmost versatility and grace.
Page 188 - O judges, be of good cheer about death, and know this of a truth — that no evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death. He and his are not neglected by the gods; nor has my own approaching end happened by mere chance. But I see clearly that to die and be released was better for me; and therefore the oracle gave no sign.
Page 190 - For the whole earth is the sepulchre of famous men; not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions in their own country, but in foreign lands there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone, but in the hearts of men.
Page 190 - An Athenian citizen does not neglect the state because he takes care of his own household; and even those of us who are engaged in business have a very fair idea of politics. We alone regard a man who takes no interest in public affairs, not as a harmless, but as a useless character; and if few of us are originators, we are all sound judges of a policy.

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