The Collected Works of J. Krishnamurti, Volume 11

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Krishnamurti Foundation of America, 1991 - Education - 432 pages
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In this volume, Krishnamurti takes great care to elucidate this necessity of a revolution within our consciousness where the problem lies before we expect any kind of revolutionary change outside of ourselves. Krishnamurti posits that if the politicians and scientists wanted to end starvation in the world it could be done." It could be done, but they are not going to do it as long as their thinking is based on nationalism, on motives of their own personal profit. And even if this far-reaching outward change were brought about, it seems to me that the problem is much deeper." "The problem is not merely starvation, war, the brutality of man to man; it is the crisis in our own consciousness. Fundamentally the problem lies within." (p. 295).
 

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Contents

Talks in Poona India
13
Third Talk September 14 1958
27
Fifth Talk September 21 1958
41
Talks in Madras India
55
Third Talk October 29 1958
68
Sixth Talk November 9 1958
83
Talks in Bombay India
101
Fourth Talk December 7 1958
118
Third Talk November 29 1959
223
Sixth Talk December 9 1959
238
Talks in Bombay India
253
Fourth Talk January 3 1960
271
Seventh Talk January 13 1960
289
Second Talk January 26 1960
307
Fourth Talk February 7 1960
321
Second Talk February 17 1960
335

Seventh Talk December 17 1958
132
Tenth Talk December 28 1958
148
Talks in New Delhi India
155
Fourth Talk February 18 1959
171
Seventh Talk March 1 1959
189
Tenth Talk March 11 1959
206
Fifth Talk February 28 1960
351
Sixth Talk March 2 1960
357
Talks in The Oak Grove Ojai California
375
Fourth Talk May 29 1960
388
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About the author (1991)

Jiddu Krishnamurti was born on May 11, 1895 in Madanapalle, India. As children, he and his brother were adopted by Dr. Annie Besant, then president of the Theosophical Society. She and others proclaimed that Krishnamurti was to be a world teacher whose coming the Theosophists had predicted. To prepare the world for this coming, a world-wide organization called the Order of the Star in the East was formed and Krishnamurti was made its head. In 1929, he renounced the role that he was expected to play, dissolved the Order, and returned all the money and property that had been donated for this work. From then until his death, he traveled the world speaking to large audiences and to individuals about the need for a radical change in mankind. He belonged to no religious organization, sect or country, nor did he subscribe to any school of political or ideological thought. On the contrary, he maintained that these are the factors that divide human beings and bring about conflict and war, and that we are all human beings first. He was a philosopher whose teachings of more than 20,000,000 words are published in more than 75 books, 700 audiocassettes, and 1200 videocassettes. He died of pancreatic cancer on February 17, 1986 at the age of 90.

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