Caius College

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F. E. Robinson & Company, 1901 - 271 pages
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Page 273 - A History of the College from its Foundation ; (2) An Account and History of its Buildings ; (3) Notices of the Connection of the College with any Important Social or Religious Events ; (4) A List of the Chief Benefactions made to the College ; (5) Some Particulars of the Contents of the College Library ; (6) An Account of the College Plate, Windows, and other Accessories ; (7) A Chapter upon the best known, and other notable but less well-known Members of the College. Each volume will be produced...
Page 125 - He has reported that the King and his followers were like the Devil and his angels, and has approved of the murder of the King, and the taking away of the House of Lords ; he has for twelve years past neglected the due administration of the Sacraments, in consequence of which many children are unbaptized ; he has ceased to sing any psalms or read any chapters in the Holy Bible on the Lord's-day in the congregation ; he has cut down most of the timber trees growing on the parsonage; he has taken undue...
Page 65 - ... as might have furnished divers massers at one instant. It was thought good by the whole consent of the heades of...
Page 65 - Caius, who hath so long kept superstitious monumentes in his college, that the evil fame thereof caused my lord of London to write very earnestly unto me to see them abolished. I could hardly have been persuadid that suche thinges by him had been reservid. But causing his owne company to make serche in that college I received an inventary of...
Page 276 - We are glad to welcome the first two volumes of what promises to be an excellent series of College Histories. . . . Well printed, handy and convenient in form, and bound in the dark or light blue of either University, these small volumes have everything external in their favour. As to their matter, all are to be entrusted to competent men, who, if they follow in the steps of the first two writers, will produce records full of interest to everybody who cares for our old Universities.
Page 261 - That felonsly faryth and berith me thens. And whether he bere me in pooke or sekke, For me he shall be hanged by the nekke, (I am so well beknown of dyverse men) But I be restored theder again.
Page 49 - ... him your letter ; and, as he was from home, I delivered it to his maid servant, for he has no wife, nor ever had one. Not a week passes in which I do not go to his house two or three times. I knock at the door ; a girl answers the knock, but without opening the door, and peeping through a crevice, asks me what I want. I ask in reply, Where is her master ? Whether he is ever at home, or means to be ? She always denies him to be in the house.
Page 70 - A long grey beard, much like that we see in the picture of him, only this was grown very rough by long time : I think it was then about 145 years from the time of his death. I touched his beard with...
Page 207 - Pompeii, and other Italian cities, were a permanent subject of interest and study to him throughout his life. In 1797 he graduated MD at Cambridge, and at once commenced a practice there, which soon became extensive. He always enjoyed a high reputation for his skill and success as a physician, particularly in respect of the treatment of the severer kinds of fever. He was elected master, May 31, 1803; having already, it is said, been a candidate eight years before, on the death of Dr Smith. He did...

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