Paleoclimate and Evolution, with Emphasis on Human Origins

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Yale University Press, 1995 - Social Science - 547 pages
This book focuses on how climatic change during the last fifteen million years--especially the last three million--has affected human evolution and other evolutionary events. Leading evolutionists and physical geologists from all over the world--authorities on such subjects as paleoceanography, palynology, mammalian paleontology, and paleoanthropology--address the relationship between climatic and biotic evolution, presenting and integrating the most up-to-date research in their fields.

Among the subjects discussed are: global and regional climatic changes; tectonism and its effects on climate; the evolution of biomes and mammals; the ways climate might have influenced the origins of hominid species; and the evolution of hominid morphologies and behaviors. The book draws on the comparatively rich data base of the Late Neogene and includes many new data sets and hypotheses on paleoclimatic changes and on floral and mammalian evolution.
 

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Contents

16A Critical Review of the Micropalcontological
16
2Climatic Effects of Late Neogene Tectonism
19
Partridge Gerard C Bund
135
3On the Connections between Paleoclimate Some Miocene Hipparions
148
and Evolution 24 I era Eiscnmann
164
4A Review of Polar Climatic Evolution during the 13Eaunal and Environmental Change in the Neogene
178
18Environmental and Paleoclimatic Evolution
249
19PlioPleistocene Climatic Variability in Subtropical 30The Influence of Climatic Changes on
262
A Reassessment of the PlioPleistoeenc Pollen D Margaret Avery
299
22The Elephantjrttw and the End J Francis Thaikeray
311
23The Potential of the Turkana Basin
319
24The Influence of Global Climatic Change and Geoffrey G Pope
331
Regional Paleoecology
524
It kite lndt
537
6Tertiary Environmental and Miotic Change Port HI The Pliocene
539
John Barron Thomas Crontn
546

Change in Southern Africa during the Neogene
297

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About the author (1995)

Elisabeth S. Vrba is professor of geology and geophysics, adjunct professor of biology, and director of ECOSAVE CENTER at Yale University. George H. Denton is professor of geological sciences and Quaternary studies at the University of Maine. Timothy C. Partridge is senior research officer, Climatology Research Group; research associate, Paleoanthropology Research Unit; and honorary professor of physical geography at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. Lloyd H. Burckle is adjunct research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, New York.

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