Creating the "Divine" Artist: From Dante to Michelangelo

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BRILL, 2004 - Art - 388 pages
Turning a skeptical eye on the idea that Renaissance artists were widely believed to be as utterly admirable as Vasari claimed, this book re-opens the question of why artists were praised and by whom, and specifically why the language of divinity was invoked, a practice the ancients did not license. The epithet ''divino'' is examined in the context of claims to liberal arts status and to analogy with poets, musicians, and other ''uomini famossi.'' The reputations of Michelangelo and Brunelleschi are compared not only with each other but with those of Dante and Ariosto, of Aretino and of the ubiquitous beloved of the sonnet tradition. Nineteenth-century reformulations of the idea of Renaissance artistic divinity are treated in the epilogue, and twentieth-century treatments of the idea of artistic "ingegno" in an appendix.
 

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Very good book.

Contents

IV
19
V
59
VI
111
VII
173
VIII
215
IX
255
X
303
XI
321
XIII
349
XIV
353
XV
355
XVI
375
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Page 13 - I reflect not without vanity, that these Discourses bear testimony of my admiration * Che Raffaelle non ebbe quest" arte da nutura, ma per lunyo studio. of that truly divine man, and I should desire that the last words which I should pronounce in this Academy, and from this place, might be the name of — MICHAEL ANGELO*.
Page 13 - It must be remembered, that this great style itself is artificial in the highest degree : it presupposes in the spectator, a cultivated and prepared artificial state of mind. It is an absurdity therefore, to suppose that we are born with this taste, though we are with the seeds of it, which, by the heat and kindly influence of this genius, may be ripened in us.

About the author (2004)

Patricia Emison, Ph.D. (1985) in the History of Art, Columbia University, is Professor at the University of New Hampshire. She specializes in the history of Italian Renaissance prints and is the author of Low and High Style in Italian Renaissance Art (Garland, 1997).

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