Eloquence is Power: Oratory & Performance in Early America

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UNC Press Books, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 287 pages
Oratory emerged as the first major form of verbal art in early America because, as John Quincy Adams observed in 1805, "eloquence was POWER." In this book, Sandra Gustafson examines the multiple traditions of sacred, diplomatic, and political speech that

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Contents

I EVANGELICAL PERFORMANCE OF SPEECH AND TEXT
40
I CULTURAL HYBRIDISM IN EVANGELICAL ORATORY
75
Life Edwards resolved the socially destabilizing themes and the deflating
79
I REPUBLICANISM AND THE ELOQUENT INDIAN
111
TREATY
120
TREATY
122
Lfazdotecti tttetf
140
symbolic significance of speech to the patriot movement Echoing language
151
MSA
172
language of suffering wounding and martyrdom voiced by the delegates
199
I DOCUMENTS AND DEBATES
200
I REPRESENTATIVE SPEECH
233
CONCLUSION
267
TRADITIONS OF THE ANCIENTS
271
art into the material representation of an emotion of mind
278
Copyright

I WORDS OF REPROACH AND WRITTEN REASON
171

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About the author (2000)

Sandra M. Gustafson is associate professor of English at the University of Notre Dame.