Memoirs of the life and negotiations of Sir W. Temple, bar: containing the most important occurrences ... from the year 1665 to the year 1681. With an account of Sir W. Temple's writings

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Printed for W. Taylor, 1714 - Great Britain - 424 pages
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Page vi - As when in tumults rise the ignoble crowd, Mad are their motions, and their tongues are loud ; And stones and brands in rattling volleys fly, And all the rustic arms that fury can supply : If then some grave and pious man appear, They hush their noise, and lend a listening ear ; He soothes with sober words their angry mood, And quenches their innate desire of blood.
Page 377 - ... part of it more particularly, were the inclination of my youth itself, so they are the pleasure of my age ; and I can truly say that, among many great employments that have fallen to my share, I have never asked or sought for any...
Page 317 - But one chief regard, necessary to this constitution, was that of the personal riches of this new council ; which, in revenues of land or offices was found to amount to about three hundred thousand pounds a year ; whereas those of a house of commons are seldom found to have exceeded four hundred thousand pounds. And authority is observed much to follow land...
Page 240 - ... not be able to bear, who was like to have enough abroad in the course of his life : and that, after the manner he was resolved to live with a wife, which should be the best he could, he would have one that he thought likely to live well with him, which he thought chiefly depended on her disposition and education...
Page 368 - UPON the survey of all these circumstances, conjunctures, and dispositions, both at home and abroad, I concluded in cold blood, that I could be of no further...
Page 204 - Sir William had quoted to Charles a saying from Gourville (a Frenchman whom the king esteemed, and whom Sir William himself considered the only foreigner he had ever known that understood England) to this effect: 'That a king of England, who will be the man of his people, is the greatest king in the world ; but, if he will be something more, by G — he is nothing at all.
Page 308 - Christendom, and the war might have been carried on, till France had yielded to the treaty of the Pyrenees, and left the world in quiet for the...
Page 407 - Sleep only safe; thine rove about the downs, And hills, and groves, and plains, and know no fear Of foes, or wolves, or cold, throughout the year. Their...
Page 220 - I was not the worfe entertain'd during the Courfe of this Adventure ; for my Lord Arlington told me every Day what he thought fit of all that pafs'd between them ; and the Prince told me not...
Page 270 - ... what they have ; and another of unquiet men, who desire to acquire what they have not; and by violent, if they cannot by lawful means. Therefore I never could find a better way of judging the...

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