Always Coming Home

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1985 - Fiction - 523 pages
18 Reviews
Ursula K. Le Guin's Always Coming Home is a major work of the imagination from one of America's most respected writers. More than five years in creation, it is a novel unlike any other. A rich and complex interweaving of story and fable, poem, artwork and music, it totally immerses the reader in the culture of the Kesh, a peaceful people of the far future who inhabit a place called the Valley on the Northern Pacific Coast. Ursula K. Le Guin makes the inhabitants of the Valley as familiar, as immediate, as wholly human as our own friends or family. Spiraling outward from the dramatic life story of a woman called Stone Telling, Le Guin's Always Coming Home interweaves wry wit, deep insight and extraordinary compassion into a compelling unity of vision.
 

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Review: Always Coming Home

User Review  - Elissa - Goodreads

Ah, what AM I thinking of this book? It's drawing me in, just shy of 50 years old, in a way it didn't when I first read it (or at least Stone Telling's story!) in my 20s. I'm enjoying the poetry more ... Read full review

Review: Always Coming Home

User Review  - Wealhtheow - Goodreads

Sort of an exercise in building a low-tech society set after our industrial modern age. The people of the Valley live a largely peaceful, non-hierarchical communal life that prioritizes listening and ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

A First Note
THE QUAIL SONG
Towards an Archaeology of the Future
STONE TELLING
The Serpentine Codex
43
Where It Is
50
The Pattern
53
SOME STORIES TOLD ALOUD
54
The Bright Void of the Wind
271
White Tree
273
The Third Childs Story
275
The Dog at the Door
280
The Life Story of Flicker of the Serpentine of Telinana
282
SOME BRIEF VALLEY TEXTS
305
Pandora Converses with the Archivist of the Library of the Madrone Lodge at Wakwahana
314
DANGEROUS PEOPLE
318

Shahugoten
57
The Keeper
60
Dried Mice
63
Dira
64
POEMS
69
How to Die in the Valley
83
Pandora Sitting by the Creek
95
FOUR ROMANTIC TALES
96
The Miller
97
Lost
98
The Brave Man
103
At the Springs of Orlu
107
POEMS
112
FOUR HISTORIES
121
A War with the Pig People
129
The Town of Chumo
134
The Trouble with the Cotton People
136
She Addresses the Reader with Agitation
147
TIME AND THE CITY
149
A Hole in the Air
154
Big Man and Little Man
157
Beginnings
160
Time in the Valley
163
STONE TELLING
173
DRAMATIC WORKS
202
The Wedding Night at Chukulmas
203
The Shouting Man the Red Woman and the Bears
213
Tabetupah
218
The Plumed Water
221
Chandi
226
Pandora Worrying About What She Is Doing Finds a Way into the Valley through the Scrub Oak
239
Dancing the Moon
242
POEMS
251
EIGHT LIFE STORIES
263
The Train
265
She Listens
266
Junco
267
CHAPTER TWO
319
Pandora Gently to the Gentle Reader
339
STONE TELLING
340
Messages Concerning the Condor
377
About a Meeting Concerning the Warriors
381
POEMS
387
From the People of the Houses of Earth in the Valley to the Other People Who Were on Earth Before Them
404
THE BACK OF THE BOOK
407
Long Names of Houses
409
Some of the Other People of the Valley
414
II Animals of the Blue Clay
420
Kinfolk
424
Lodges Societies Arts
430
What They Wore in the Valley
434
What They Ate
437
Kesh Musical Instruments
444
Maps
450
The World Dance
454
The Sun Dance
462
About the Train
469
Some Notes on Medical Practices
471
A Treatise on Practices
478
Playing
480
Some Generative Metaphors
483
Three Poems by Pandora Written Sideways from the Valley to the City of Man
486
Living on the Coast Energy and Dancing
488
Love
493
Written Kesh
494
The Kesh Alphabet
496
The Modes of Earth and Sky
499
A Note and a Chart Concerning Narrative Modes
500
Spoken and Written Literature
502
Pandora No Longer Worrying
506
Kesh Numbers
509
Stammersong
525
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

Ursula K. Le Guin is the author of novels, children's books, short stories, critical writings, and poetry. She is the winner of the National Book Award and the Nebula and Hugo awards for science fiction. She grew up in Berkeley and the Napa Valley and now lives in Portland, Oregon. Her most recent book is The Telling (2000).

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