The Gay Science: With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 18, 2010 - Philosophy - 416 pages
Nietzsche called The Gay Science "the most personal of all my books." It was here that he first proclaimed the death of God—to which a large part of the book is devoted—and his doctrine of the eternal recurrence.

Walter Kaufmann's commentary, with its many quotations from previously untranslated letters, brings to life Nietzsche as a human being and illuminates his philosophy. The book contains some of Nietzsche's most sustained discussions of art and morality, knowledge and truth, the intellectual conscience and the origin of logic.

Most of the book was written just before Thus Spoke Zarathustra, the last part five years later, after Beyond Good and Evil. We encounter Zarathustra in these pages as well as many of Nietzsche's most interesting philosophical ideas and the largest collection of his own poetry that he himself ever published.

Walter Kaufmann's English versions of Nietzsche represent one of the major translation enterprises of our time. He is the first philosopher to have translated Nietzsche's major works, and never before has a single translator given us so much of Nietzsche.
 

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User Review  - jculkin - LibraryThing

The Gay Science: the source of and solution to all your worries about lack of meaning in life. That is how it feels right now anyway. I came to this book to find out Nietzsche's interpretation of ... Read full review

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User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

The majority if this book consists of just under 400 short pieces, between a few lines and couple of pages in length, in which Nietzsche delivers his profound reflexions and aphorisms. There are also ... Read full review

Contents

Translators Introduction
3
29
12
230
14
327
19
62
36
Prelude in German Rhymes
39
My Roses
45
3
53
298
189
144
190
244
211
dangers?
220
Sanctus Januarius
221
To those who preach
234
348
257
338
263

Loss of dignity 81
61
Unconscious virtues
82
363
88
290
91
Finding motives for our 37 Owing to three errors
105
234
106
The signs of corruption 96 46 Our amazement
111
To the realists 121 60 Women and their action
123
Devotion
125
The animal with a good
131
On the origin of poetry
138
238
141
293
167
Origin of knowledge
169
We Fearless Ones
277
Morality as a problem
283
On the origin of scholars
290
On the origin of religions
296
364
304
366
317
378
334
Songs of Prince Vogelfrei
349
In the South
355
Song of a Theocritical Goat
361
My Happiness369
369
Acknowledgments
376
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was born in Prussia in 1844. After the death of his father, a Lutheran minister, Nietzsche was raised from the age of five by his mother in a household of women. In 1869 he was appointed Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, where he taught until 1879 when poor health forced him to retire. He never recovered from a nervous breakdown in 1889 and died eleven years later. Known for saying that “god is dead,” Nietzsche propounded his metaphysical construct of the superiority of the disciplined individual (superman) living in the present over traditional values derived from Christianity and its emphasis on heavenly rewards. His ideas were appropriated by the Fascists, who turned his theories into social realities that he had never intended.

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