For the Defense of Themselves and the State: The Original Intent and Judicial Interpretation of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms

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Praeger, Jan 1, 1994 - Law - 286 pages
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This book] provides the kind of scholarly resource that educated citizens need to think for themselves, a rich digest of primary sources documenting--in their own words--the views, motives, and intentions of the Framers, historic commentators, legislators, and judiciary who have debated the right to keep and bear arms from the origins of our republic. "Preston K. Covey, Carnegie Mellon University "

Beginning with its origins in the English Civil War, Clayton Cramer traces the development in the United States of the right to keep and bear arms--through the Constitutional Convention, the ratification debates that followed, its inclusion by Congress in the Bill of Rights, to the present controversy over gun control. This book provides important background, analysis, documentation, and perspective for the ongoing national debate over arms.

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User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

The author has analyzed more than 200 decisions of the federal and state courts -- all of them, to avoid the appearance of a bias. He also studied the social and legislative history of gun control ... Read full review

Contents

Definitions
1
European Origins
19
The Legislative History of the Second Amendment
31
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

Clayton E. Cramer has an MA in History from Sonoma State University, and has taught history at Boise State University and George Fox University (Boise branch). A writer whose work has been published in the San Jose Mercury News, National Review, and the American Rifleman, he has published several academic books on history and firearms, including For the Defense of Themselvesand the State and Black Demographic Data, 1790-1860. He writes a monthly column for Shotgun News (circ. 95,000).

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