The Jews in the Soviet Union Since 1917: Paradox of Survival, Volume 1

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NYU Press, 1990 - History - 560 pages
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The last five years have brought such extraordinary changes to Germany and Europe as to make the previous forty years of Cold War existence seem deceptively placid and well- ordered by comparison. The collapse of communist rule in East Germany in the midst of massive demonstrations against the Honecker regime in late 1989 were only the beginning. The monumental changes that have taken place since have affected all aspects of German identity, both inside and outside of the now-unified nation.

This book tackles the question of just where the new Federal Republic of Germany stands after 45 years and where it appears to be headed. The central concern of this volume is the nation's evolving united--or disunited--sense of identity. This identity, in a constant state of flux, takes many forms: the striking differences between East and West German views; German pacifism and national pride; the role of Germany in the world; the reemergence of radical right groups; and opinions towards foreigners and the right of political asylum. Of central interest to scholars of German and European history and politics, this book is a thorough assessment of Germany in the post-wall era.

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About the author (1990)

The late Nora Levin taught history at Gratz College. She has written "THe Holocaust" and "While the Messiah Tarried: Jewish Socialist Movements".

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