Limited Views: Essays on Ideas and Letters

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Harvard Univ Asia Center, 1998 - Literary Collections - 483 pages
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This translation of 65 pieces from Qian Zhongshu's Guanzhui bian (Limited Views) makes available for the first time in English a representative selection from Qian's massive four-volume collection of essays and reading notes on the classics of early Chinese literature. First published in 1979, it has been hailed as one of the most insightful and comprehensive treatments of themes and motifs in early Chinese writing to appear in this century. Scholar, novelist, and essayist Qian Zhongshu (b. 1910) is arguably contemporary China's foremost man of letters, and Limited Views is recognized as the culmination of his study of literature in both the Chinese and the Western traditions.
 

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Contents

The Meaning Surpasses the Image
29
Worldly Frustration and Literary Composition
35
Personal Conduct and Literary Style
41
Poetic Landscapes and Fidelity to Nature
48
The Corruption of Consciousness
56
Sadness as the Primary Value in Music
67
Saddened by a Height
74
Complex Emotions in Literature
83
Literary Style and the Detection of Forgeries
239
Literary Writing and Utilitarian Prose
248
On Laozi with Reference to Buddhism
255
The Insights and Myopia of Mystical Philosophies
263
Heaven and Earth Are Inhuman the Sage Is Inhuman
269
Modeling Oneself on Nature
282
Fallacia Divisionis
290
On Not Speaking While Speaking
297

Script and Nature Script and Painting
91
Resonance in Criticism on the Arts
97
Metaphors Have Two Handles and Several Sides
121
Human Life Is Like Ice
130
Gifts with Symbolic Meanings
141
The Domesticating Metaphor
148
Synaesthesia
155
The Name but Not the Reality
163
Impossible Tropes
171
On Not Recognizing Mirrors
180
The Motif of the Other Shore
189
The Hermeneutic Circle
195
Characters with Multiple Meanings Used Simultaneously
202
Dialectics in Words and Emotions
208
Chiasmus
215
Quoting Out of Context
221
Poetic Conventions and the Problem of Distorted Meaning
231
Right Words Look Like Contradictions
304
Fate Versus Divine Justice
311
Witchcraft
326
More Joy on Earth than in Heaven
332
Time in Heaven Earth and Hell
339
Rebuking Heaven
345
Born from a Brush and Killed by a Painting
353
Stupefying the People
363
The Concepts Chinese and Barbarian
373
Giving Books to the Barbarians
382
Marriage and Fate
393
Monks and Lice
401
Tears at Partings
412
Works Cited
421
Finding List
463
Index of Proper Names Titles and Terms
471
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About the author (1998)

Ronald C. Egan is Professor of Sinology in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University.

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