Idealism as a Practical Creed: Being the Lectures on Philosophy and Modern Life Delivered Before the University of Sydney

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J. Maclehose, 1909 - Idealism - 299 pages
 

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Page 144 - For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, And as a root out of a dry ground. He hath no form nor comeliness; And when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.
Page 134 - Nor less I deem that there are Powers Which of themselves our minds impress; That we can feed this mind of ours In a wise passiveness.
Page 216 - It is a partnership in all science ; a partnership in all art ; a partnership in every virtue, and in all perfection. As the ends of such a partnership cannot be obtained in many generations, it becomes a partnership not only between those who are living, but between those who are living, those who are dead, and those who are to be born.
Page 192 - Therefore I summon age To grant youth's heritage, Life's struggle having so far reached its term: Thence shall I pass, approved A man, for aye removed From the developed brute; a god though in the germ.
Page 201 - Poetry is the most philosophic of all writing; it is so; its object is truth, not individual and local but general, and operative, not standing upon external testimony but carried alive into the heart by passion — truth which is its own testimony, which gives competence and confidence to the tribunal to which it appeals, and receives them from the same tribunal.
Page 173 - The historical decoration was purposely of no more importance than a background requires; and my stress lay on the incidents in the development of a soul: little else is worth study.
Page 136 - Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.
Page 120 - Two men I honour, and no third. First, the toilworn Craftsman that with earth-made Implement laboriously conquers the earth, and makes her man's. Venerable to me is the hard Hand; crooked, coarse; wherein notwithstanding lies a cunning virtue indefeasibly royal, as of the Sceptre of this Planet.
Page 169 - How divine, The liberty, for frail, for mortal man, To roam at large among unpeopled glens And mountainous retirements, only trod By devious footsteps ; regions consecrate To oldest time ! and, reckless of the storm That keeps the raven quiet in her nest, Be as a presence or a motion — one Among the many there...
Page 149 - Ocean and earth, the solid frame of earth And ocean's liquid mass, in gladness lay Beneath him : — Far and wide the clouds were touched, And in their silent faces could he read Unutterable love. Sound needed none, Nor any voice of joy ; his spirit drank The spectacle : sensation, soul, and form All melted into him ; they swallowed up His animal being ; in them did he live, And by them did he live ; they were his life.

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