Mediaeval Philosophy Illustrated from the System of Thomas Aquinas

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Harvard University Press, 1922 - Philosophy, Medieval - 153 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
8
III
20
IV
26
V
32
VI
37
VII
46
VIII
53
XI
90
XII
99
XIII
108
XIV
112
XV
117
XVI
129
XVII
136
XVIII
139

IX
66
X
80

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Page 135 - The astronomer and the physicist both may prove the same conclusion — that the earth, for instance, is round : the astronomer by means of mathematics (ie, abstracting from matter), but the physicist by means of matter itself. Hence there is no reason why those things which may be learnt from philosophical science, so far as they can be known by natural reason, may not also be taught us by another science so far as they fall within revelation. Hence theology included in Sacred Doctrine differs in...
Page 22 - Nihil est in intellectu quod prius non fuerit in sensu. "There is nothing in the mind which was not first in the senses.
Page 111 - Consequently in contingent matters, such as natural and human things, it is enough for a thing to be certain, as being true in the greater number of instances, though at times and less frequently it fail. SECOND ARTICLE WHETHER IT BELONGS TO HUMAN LAW TO REPRESS ALL VICES?
Page 138 - Wulf, viewing esthetic experience in the light of this objective-subjective interpretation, says the beautiful does not "... belong exclusively to things, as the Greeks thought, nor to the subject alone who reacts and enjoys, as some contemporary philosophers maintain. But it is as it were midway between object and subject, and consists in a correspondence between the two.
Page 124 - in the measure that positive law is in disagreement with the natural law, it is no longer a law, but a corruption of...
Page 14 - Thus, for" example, he to whom the geometrical proposition, that the angles of a triangle are together equal to two right angles...
Page 135 - Hence there is no reason why those things which are dealt with in the philosophical sciences, so far as they can be known by natural reason, may not also be taught us by another science so far as they fall within revelation. Hence theology which pertains to sacred doctrine differs in genus from that theology which is part of philosophy.
Page 89 - On account of the spirituality of his soul, man occupies a central position in the universe. He is a spirit, but one destined to display its life in a body. He is midway between merely corporeal things and pure spirits. He is, to use a comparison dear to the Middle Ages, a microcosm, for all the perfections of reality as a whole meet in him in a wonderful alloy. CHAPTER XI GOD I. Proofs of the existence of God. II. God is Infinite Being or pure existence. III. The Divine Attributes. IV. Conclusion....
Page 118 - Whether he be slave or free, rich or poor, ruler or ruled, an individual has "the right to preserve his life, to marry and to bring up children, to develop his intelligence, to be instructed, to hold to the truth, to live in Society.
Page 87 - Whereas the vital principles of plants or animals are plunged in matter (immersa) the human soul can subsist without body, although the body could not be without the soul. Being spiritual, the soul has no quantitative or material parts in it. Moreover, self-consciousness does not admit of internal composition, since it is a process by which our soul imposes its whole self upon itself (reditio completa). If one folds a corporeal thing, for example a sheet of paper, only a part covers another part,...

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