The Hobbit, Or, There and Back Again

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Houghton Mifflin, 1984 - Juvenile Fiction - 290 pages
125 Reviews
This edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic is illustrated with 48 paintings by noted artist Michael Hague.
Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum.
Written for J.R.R. Tolkien's own children, The Hobbit has sold many millions of copies worldwide and established itself as a modern classic.

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User Review  - SESchend - LibraryThing

Very very good adaptation of Tolkien's HOBBIT I finally took down from the shelves after 11 years. I wanted to reread the actual novel but didn't have time, so this was my fall-back. Good storytelling with great art by David Wenzel. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DarthDeverell - LibraryThing

In 1989, Eclipse Comics had Charles Dixon and Sean Deming adapt J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit with art by David Wenzel. The story is as faithful to the source material as it can be in an adapted format ... Read full review

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About the author (1984)

A writer of fantasies, Tolkien, a professor of language and literature at Oxford University, was always intrigued by early English and the imaginative use of language. In his greatest story, the trilogy The Lord of the Rings (1954--56), Tolkien invented a language with vocabulary, grammar, syntax, even poetry of its own. Though readers have created various possible allegorical interpretations, Tolkien has said: "It is not about anything but itself. (Certainly it has no allegorical intentions, general, particular or topical, moral, religious or political.)" In The Adventures of Tom Bombadil (1962), Tolkien tells the story of the "master of wood, water, and hill," a jolly teller of tales and singer of songs, one of the multitude of characters in his romance, saga, epic, or fairy tales about his country of the Hobbits. Tolkien was also a formidable medieval scholar, as evidenced by his work, Beowulf: The Monster and the Critics (1936) and his edition of Anciene Wisse: English Text of the Anciene Riwle. Among his works published posthumously, are The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún and The Fall of Arthur, which was edited by his son, Christopher. In 2013, his title, The Hobbit (Movie Tie-In) made The New York Times Best Seller List.

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