The Pictorial Key to the Tarot

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Mar 6, 2012 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 256 pages
34 Reviews
Long used in telling fortunes and popular today among New Agers, Tarot cards are regarded by many as "the training wheels" on the bicycle of psychic development. Centuries of scientific progress have not diminished the irresistible attraction of gazing at picture cards to see the future and determine one's fate.
This book by Arthur Edward Waite, the designer of the most widely known Tarot deck and distinguished scholar of the Kabbalah, is the essential Tarot reference. The pictorial key contains a detailed description of each card in the celebrated 78-card Rider-Waite Tarot deck, along with regular and reversed meanings. Contents describe symbols and secret tradition; the four suits of Tarot, including wands, cups, swords, and pentacles; the recurrence of cards in dealing; an ancient Celtic method of divination; as well as wonderful illustrations of Tarot cards.
While the perfect complement to old-style fortune telling, The Pictorial Key to the Tarot also serves to make the Tarot entirely accessible to modern-day readers. It is also the classic guide to the Rider-Waite deck and to Tarot symbolism in general.
 

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Review: Pictorial Key to the Tarot

User Review  - Goodreads

Starting my Spring Break off right! The text is dense, but interesting. If you like playing Dixit or acting improv, you'll love learning about Tarot. Read full review

Review: The Pictorial Key to the Tarot

User Review  - Shannon - Goodreads

Starting my Spring Break off right! The text is dense, but interesting. If you like playing Dixit or acting improv, you'll love learning about Tarot. Read full review

All 19 reviews »

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About the author (2012)

Ivan Vladimirovich Lopukhin (1756-1816) was inspired by the thought of Johan Arndt, Jacob Bohme, Karl von Eckartshausen, and Louis-Claude de Saint-Martin. Lopukhin was a colonel in the Russian army until 1782 and was afterwards appointed president of the Court of Appeals in Moscow. As one of the leading Freemasons and Rosicrucians, he sought to mitigate the cruelties of Russian legislation as much as he was able. When the decree on the free presses was issued by Catherine the Great in 1783, he founded his "I.V. Lopukhin Free Press," enabling him to publish a great number of mystical, Masonic, alchemical and enlightened books in the Russian language. In 1784 he also became a member of the "Typographical Society in Moscow" which had been established by the Moscow Rosicrucians around Nikolai Novikov.

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