The Art of Landscape Painting in Oil Colour

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J. B. Lippincott Company, 1907 - Landscape painting - 107 pages
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An enjoyable read- With all the poetry, confidence, and mystique of old materials handbooks. Anyone that admires the paintings of Turner, Constable, and Corot would undoubtedly enjoy this perspective.

Contents

I
1
II
6
III
14
IV
24
V
32
VI
45
VII
51
VIII
64
IX
72
X
77
XI
83
XII
87
XIII
93

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Page 85 - ... Legislatures of the United States, and the " lobbying" at our own Legislatures, afford instances numerous and various of the means by which members have been induced to vote as they would not have voted, had they not been influenced by special means of a personal, and not seldom of a selfish character. That it has been so in the past, and is likely to be so frequently in the future, is to be deplored as an evil; but I fear it is one of the evil results of the imperfection of human nature for...
Page 42 - ... the entities in some way; but in what way? How do the entities combine to form the proposition? Russell admits that he has no answer to this question; but in fact the situation is worse than he suggests. The problem is in principle unsolvable within the metaphysical framework which he establishes. It would require more space than I have at my disposal to argue this point with any care. Very roughly, the point is that according to Russell's early metaphysics everything - 'Whatever may be an object...
Page 42 - ... constitute a disease any more than does suppuration." It is the exclusive indication of no one malady and the outcome of no one special state of defective health. Although one recognizes the fact that tubercle appears in scrofula, yet one is positively loth to term scrofula a tuberculous disease ; and I would almost go so far as to say that it would be well not to call it a tuberculous disease, until the bias associated with the latter term has been removed, until that term is accepted in a more...
Page 1 - ... and if he gets, after great labour, something approaching what he wanted, the evidence of his fatigue is apparent. There is no fatigue in Nature. Nature expresses life with a curious and interesting sense of directness. Although we know there are millions of years behind her simplest developments, yet the result is one of apparent ease, a spontaneous and direct effort. So should your Art be, and it is in this respect it should resemble Nature, revealing an infinitely higher quality than the mere...
Page 85 - ... medium and technique. Should he attempt to disregard them, he will fail to express the desired values satisfactorily, or will express them less adequately than is possible in some other medium. Thus, what Alfred East says of landscape painting is equally applicable to sculpture or to any other art: "The raison d'etre of the existence of the landscape painter is that he can discern and reveal to us beauties in Nature which cannot be revealed by the sister arts .... if you have a method of expression...
Page 95 - For example, if I pitch my picture as near as I can to the pitch • ^ .• of Nature, and paint one passage exactly of the same intensity or tone as the same passage in Nature, I have struck the key, as it \ \ were, in which my tune must be played.
Page 1 - Stand to your work, and draw and paint from your shoulder in a confident and manly fashion, feeling that you know what you want, and go for it fearlessly, with a keen observation of Nature. Look long at her, consider carefully, and then, when you have made up your mind, express it confidently and in a manly fashion. Do not go to your work as a task, but as a labour of love. One can Nature, revealing an infinitely higher quality than the mere imitation of her surface.
Page 5 - You need not be ashamed of your calling, for if you knew the innermost feelings of the hearts of others, you might find that you are envied by those who cannot purchase the pleasure you have in following the calling you love best in life.
Page 78 - ... it vivifies your subject, and gives a soul to your picture. It should always manifest its presence. It is easily forgotten in the studio, but not so readily when one faces Nature.
Page 95 - A." Say that in Nature it is glowing sunlight, and that it is impossible for any pigment to reach so high a key of colour, I am forced to lower my key to

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