From Where We Stand: War, Women's Activism and Feminist Analysis

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Zed Books, Mar 15, 2007 - Political Science - 286 pages
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This original study by the, the product of 80,000 miles of travel by the author over a two-year period, examines women's activism against wars as far apart as Sierra Leone, Colombia and India. It shows women on different sides of conflicts in the former Yugoslavia and Israel refusing enmity and co-operating for peace. It describes international networks of women opposing US and Western European militarism and the so-called 'war on terror'. Women are often motivated by adverse experiences in male-led anti-war movements, preferring to choose different methods of protest and remain in control of their own actions. But like the mainstream movements, women's groups differ - some are pacifist while others put justice before non-violence; some condemn nationalism as a cause of war while others see it as a legitimate source of identity. The very existence of feminist antimilitarism proposes a radical shift in our understanding of war, linking the violence of patriarchal power to that of class oppression and ethnic 'othering'.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Origins of the book
2
Research approach
3
Some concepts and theories
5
The shape of the book
8
Different wars womens responses
13
a feminist response to genocide in Gujarat
23
women civil society and the rebuilding of peace
33
the hard road from rhetoric to practice
143
Limitations of the institutional route
147
A valuable lever for women antiwar activists
152
Methodology of womens protest
156
Responsible process minimal structure
157
Vigilling and other street work
160
From the schools to the law courts
164
Ritual and symbolism
170

Against imperialist wars three transnational networks
48
Women in Black for justice against war
51
Women for Peace
62
East AsiaUSPuerto Rico Womens Network against Militarism
67
Disloyal to nation and state antimilitarist women in Serbia
79
the manipulation of national identity
80
A feminist response to nationalism and war
83
Feminist analysis and counterinformation
86
Addressing the deadly issues of identity and place
88
The personal is international
93
from guilt to responsibility
101
A refusal of othering Palestinian and Israeli women
106
unilateral Israeli moves
109
Israeli activism against the occupation
110
Bat Shalom the Jerusalem Center for Women and the Jerusalem Link
112
Palestinian perspectives
116
Israeli perspectives
118
a basis for dialogue?
120
Palestinians in a Jewish state
122
Moving beyond dialogue
125
Achievements and contradictions WILPF and the UN
132
The Womens International League for Peace and Freedom
133
WILPFs organization and scope
136
Carrying women peace and security into the UN
138
The political use of silence
172
Womens peace camps
173
putting the body into play
176
Prefigurative struggle
178
Towards coherence pacifism nationalism racism
181
National belonging and ethnic otherness
192
Committed to creative argument
202
Choosing to be women what war says to feminism
206
The valorization of everyday life
208
The trope of motherhood
209
Male sexsexual violence
212
Organizing as womenonly
215
women who want to men who dont
222
A feminism evoked by militarism and war
225
Gender violence and war what feminism says to war studies
231
feminists marginal notes on international relations
232
doing gender
235
Theory grounded in womens experience of war
239
an erect posture on the home front
242
enough aggression not too much
247
the woman the labourer and the stranger
252
Bibliography
260
Index
276
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Cynthia Cockburn, a feminist researcher and writer, is Visiting Professor in the Department of Sociology at City University and active in the international anti-militarist network Women in Black.

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