More Than Human

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Ballantine Books, 1972 - Extrasensory perception - 188 pages
13 Reviews

From one of the greatest practitioners of science fiction comes a genre-bending novel that is as affectingly humane as it is speculatively daring.

There's Lone, who can make a man blow his own brains out just by looking at him. There's Janie, who moves things without touching them, and the unique power of the teleporting twins. There's Baby, who invented an antigravity engine while still in the cradle, and Gerry, who has everything it takes to run the world -- except for a conscience. Separately, they are talented freaks. Together they compose a single organism that may represent the next step in evolution. As the protagonist of More Than Human struggle to find out whether they are meant to help humanity or destroy it, Theodore Sturgeon explores the questions of power and morality, individuality and belonging, with sophistication and lyricism rarely seen in science fiction.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - satyridae - LibraryThing

It's been well over 20 years since I last read this book. It's every bit as great as I remember it, and more. Quietly magnificent, this science fiction novel reverberates. Like looking at visual art, it's the negative spaces in this novel which perfect it. Highly recommended. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - crazybatcow - LibraryThing

This was very difficult to finish reading... I see now that it was originally written as 3 short stories (sort of), and that explains how disjointed it is. But... it wasn't this disjointedness that ... Read full review

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About the author (1972)

Science fiction author Theodore Sturgeon was born Edward Hamilton Waldo in New York City on February 26, 1918. He sold his first short story, Heavy Insurance, while serving in the United States Merchant Marine from 1935 to 1938. Many of his stories explored romantic and sexual themes. He won numerous awards including the 1954 International Fantasy Award for More than Human, the 1970 Nebula and Hugo Awards for Slow Sculpture, and the 1985 World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement. He was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000. He died of pneumonia in Eugene, Oregon on May 8, 1985.

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