An Introduction to Pain and its relation to Nervous System Disorders

Front Cover
Anna A. Battaglia
John Wiley & Sons, Mar 2, 2016 - Science - 448 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

Introduction to Pain and its relation to Nervous System Disorders provides an accessible overview of the latest developments in the science underpinning pain research, including, but not limited to, the physiological, pathological and psychological aspects. This unique book fills a gap in current literature by focussing on the intricate relationship between pain and human nervous system disorders such as Autism, Alzheimer Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Depression and Multiple Sclerosis. This fully illustrated, colour handbook will help non-experts, including advanced undergraduate and new postgraduate students, become familiar with the current, wide-ranging areas of research that cover every aspect of the field from chronic and inflammatory pain to neuropathic pain and biopsychosocial models of pain, functional imaging and genetics.

Contributions from leading experts in neuroscience and psychiatry provide both factual information and critical points of view on their approach and the theoretical framework behind their choices. An appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of brain imaging technology applied to pain research in humans provides the tools required to understand current cutting edge literature on the topic. Chapters covering placebo effects in analgesia and the psychology of pain give a thorough overview of cognitive, psychological and social influences on pain perception. Sections exploring pain in the lifecycle and in relation to nervous system disorders take particular relevance from a clinical point of view. Furthermore, an intellectually stimulating chapter analysing the co-morbidity of pain and depression provides a philosophical angle rarely presented in related handbooks. The references to external research databases and relevant websites aim to prompt readers to become critical and independent thinkers, and motivate them to carry out further reading on these topics.

Introduction to Pain and its relation to Nervous System Disorders is essential reading for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students in neuroscience, medical and biomedical sciences, as well as for clinical and medical healthcare professionals involved in pain management.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Title Page
Acknowledgements
Anatomy of pain pathways
Spinal plasticity of the nociceptive
References
Symptoms and pathology
Sensory signs and symptoms
Central pathology in neuropathic pain
Brain imaging in experimental pain
Placebo effects in pain
Psychology and pain
The gate control theory of pain
Evidence for CBT ACT and multidimensional
Pain in neonates and infants
How do people with autism spectrum
Pain and depression

Roles of the immune system in neuropathic pain
Conclusion
Recent advances in neuroimmune
Genetics and epigenetics of pain
The cannabinoid system and its role
References
EphB receptors and persistent pain
Pain in multiple sclerosis
Introduction
Acknowledgement
the placebo and nocebo effects
Pathogenesis
End User License Agreement
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2016)

Dr Anna A. Battaglia, School of Biomedical Sciences, King's College London, Currently a Lecturer in the Department of Anatomy & Human Sciences at King's College London. Research interests include: Chronic pain; Eph Receptors and ephrins; Biopsychosocial models of chronic pain.
Her research experience has led her to developing new ideas in the pedagogy of Neuroscience and of scientific disciplines in general. She runs a third year undergraduate module called: Perspectives on Nervous System disorders. I am also setting up a "Pain Scenario" for MBBS2 students on the Neurobiology of Pain and on the interdisciplinary management of chronic pain syndromes, with the aim to fill a gap in the undergraduate medical education.

Bibliographic information