Pearl: An English Poem of the 14th Century

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Sir Israel Gollancz
D. Nutt, 1891 - English literature - 141 pages
 

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Page 24 - Now thurgh kynde of the kyste that hyt con close, To a perle of prys hit is put in pref ; And thou hacz called thy wyrde a thef, That oght of noght hacz mad the cler ; Thou blamez the bote of thy meschef, Thou art no kynde jueler.
Page l - O moral Gower, this book I direct To thee, and to the philosophical Strode, To vouchsafe there need is to correct, Of your benignities and zcalgs good," And the book ends with a prayer that Christ may make us worthy of His mercy.
Page xxxii - Then he lurks there and seeks in each nook of the nav« the best sheltered spot, yet nowhere he finds rest or recovery, but filthy mire wherever he goes; but God is ever dear; and he tarried at length and called to the Prince. . . . . . . Then he reached a nook and held himself there, where no foul filth encumbered him about. He sat there as safe, save for darkness alone, as in the boat's stern, where he had slept ere. Thus, in the beast's bowel, he abides there alive, three days and three nights,...
Page 28 - To dol agayn, thenne I dowyne. Now haf I fonte that I for-lete, Schal I efte for-go hit er ever I fyne? Why...
Page xxvii - ... with red, and several illuminations, coarsely executed, serve by way of illustration, each of which occupies a page. 1. Four of these are prefixed to the first poem. In the first the Author is represented slumbering in a meadow, by the side of a streamlet, clad in a long red gown, having falling sleeves, turned up with white, and a blue hood attached round the neck.
Page 6 - Fro spot my spyryt ther sprang in space, My body on balke ther bod in sweven ; My goste is gon in Godez grace, In aventure ther mervaylez meven. I ne wyste in this worlde quere that hit wace, 65 Bot I knew me keste ther klyfez...
Page xlvi - He felt the sentiment of being spread O'er all that moves, and all that seemeth still ; The presences of Nature in the sky And on the earth ; the visions of the hills, And souls of lonely places.
Page xxxii - ... mid grease that savored as he his bower was arrayed, who would fain risk no ill. Then he lurks there and seeks in each nook of the nave the best sheltered spot, yet nowhere he finds rest or recovery, but filthy mire wherever he goes; but God is ever dear; and he tarried at length and called to the Prince. . . . Then he reached a nook and held himself there, where no foul filth encumbered him about. He sat there as safe, save for darkness alone, as in the boat's stern, where he had slept ere.
Page xxvii - ... contrast to the illustrations of the MS., now reproduced, the portrayal of the poet's theme as conceived by the greatest of modern Pre-Raphaelites is given as frontispiece to the present volume. Two illustrations follow after the pages of ' Pearl ' ; they are evidently intended to represent respectively Noah and his family in the Ark, and the prophet Daniel expounding the writing on the wall to the affrighted Belshazzar and his queen. It is clear that these have nothing to do with the subject...
Page 64 - When I wente fro yor worlde wete, He calde me to hys bonerte: "Cum hyder to me, my lemman swete, For mote ne spot is non in the.

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