The Mathematical Papers of Isaac Newton:

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 3, 2008 - Mathematics - 648 pages
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The bringing together, in an annotated and critical edition, of all the known mathematical papers of Isaac Newton marks a step forward in the publication of the works of this great natural philosopher. In all, there are eight volumes in this present edition. Translations of papers in Latin face the original text and notes are printed on the page-openings to which they refer, so far as possible. Each volume contains a short index of names only and an analytical table of contents; a comprehensive index to the complete work is included in Volume VIII. Volume I covers three exceptionally productive years: Newton's final year as an undergraduate at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the two following years, part of which were spent at his home in Lincolnshire on account of the closure of the university during an outbreak of bubonic plague.
 

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Contents

FOREWORD TO VOLUME I
xlvii
Early education and innate mathematical abilities 3 Undergraduate years and first scientific
10
ANNOTATIONS FROM OUGHTRED DESCARTES SCHOOTEN
25
ANNOTATIONS FROM VIETE AND OUGHTRED
64
ANNOTATIONS FROM WALLIS
89
INTRODUCTION
145
Fermat and Descartes 148 That to Barrow Hudde and Wallis 150 Description ofhis early
151
23v27v A The general rule of 5 simplified by considering
203
57r57v An algorithm for finding the fluxion of a given fluent
382
51r51v 1 A general account of the limitmotion of points
392
THE OCTOBER 1666 TRACT ON FLUXIONS
400
2 The former Theorems applyed to resolving of Problems Tangents to geometrical
440
3 Of Gravity The center of Motion in any body and its construction examples
446
PROMINENCE OF
451
of a parabolic template 462 6 Constructions of the parabola by points
463
THE THEORY AND CONSTRUCTION OF EQUATIONS 16651666
489

D The vertex of a curve found as its meet with its axis illustrated by the preceding
210
WORK ON THE CARTESIAN SUBNORMAL WINTER 1 6645
213
93v116r First systematic evaluation of derivatives by applying
219
MISCELLANEOUS PROBLEMS IN ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY
234
85r86r The squareing of severall croked lines of ye Seacond
241
THE CALCULUS BECOMES AN ALGORITHM MID1665
298
30v 30r 1 The derivation of firstorder fluxional equations from
367
MISCELLANEOUS RESEARCHES IN ARITHMETIC NUMBER
540
APPENDIX
547
THE ESSAY OF REFRACTIONS WINTER 16656?
559
THE REFRACTION OF LIGHT AT A SPHERICAL SURFACE
577
INDEX OF NAMES
587
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Galois Theory
Harold M. Edwards
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About the author (2008)

Born at Woolsthorpe, England, Sir Isaac Newton was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge University, where he graduated in 1665. During the plague of 1666, he remained at Woolsthorpe, during which time he formulated his theory of fluxions (the infinitesimal calculus) and the main outlines of his theories of mechanics, astronomy, and optics, including the theory of universal gravitation. The results of his researches were not circulated until 1669, but when he returned to Trinity in 1667, he was immediately appointed to succeed his teacher as professor of mathematics. His greatest work, the Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, was published in 1687 to immediate and universal acclaim. Newton was elected to Parliament in 1689. In 1699, he was appointed head of the royal mint, and four years later he was elected president of the Royal Society; both positions he held until his death. In later life, Newton devoted his main intellectual energies to theological speculation and alchemical experiments. In April 1705, Queen Anne knighted Newton during a royal visit to Trinity College, Cambridge. He was only the second scientist to have been awarded knighthood. Newton died in his sleep in London on March 31, 1727, and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Because of his scientific nature, Newton's religious beliefs were never wholly known. His study of the laws of motion and universal gravitation became his best-known discoveries, but after much examination he admitted that, "Gravity explains the motions of the planets, but it cannot explain who set the planets in motion. God governs all things and knows all that is or can be done.

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