South America: a geography reader

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Rand, McNally & Company, 1915 - Readers - 354 pages
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Page 15 - ... above six thousand feet. They are covered by a wide mantle of perpetual snow, and numerous cascades pour their waters, through the woods, into the narrow channel below. In many parts, magnificent glaciers extend from the mountain side to the water's edge. It is scarcely possible to imagine anything more beautiful than the beryl-like blue of these glaciers, and especially as contrasted with the dead white of the upper expanse of snow.
Page 168 - O Creator! O conquering Uiracocha! Everpresent Uiracocha ! Thou who art equal unto the ends of the earth ! Thou who givest life and strength to mankind, saying let this be a man, and let this be a woman ; and as thou sayest so thou givest life, and vouchsafest that men shall live in health and peace and free from danger ! Thou who dwellest in the heights of heaven, in the thunder and in the storm-clouds, hear us, and grant us eternal life...
Page 76 - Sooner shall these mountains crumble into dust than Chileans or Argentines shall break this peace which, at the feet of Christ the Redeemer, they have sworn to maintain.
Page 270 - At the bottom, probably twelve hundred feet below us, and towards the centre, there was a rudely circular spot, about one-tenth of the diameter of the crater, the pipe of the volcano, its channel of communication with lower regions, filled with incandescent, if not molten lava, glowing and burning : with flames travelling to and fro over its surface, and scintillations scattering as from a wood fire ; lighted by tongues of flickering flame, which issued from the cracks in the surrounding slopes.
Page 14 - Channel divides into two arms ; and we entered the northern one. The scenery here becomes even grander than before. The lofty mountains on the north side compose the granitic axis, or backbone of the country, and boldly rise to a height of between three and four thousand feet, with one peak above six thousand feet. They are covered by a wide mantle of perpetual snow, and numerous cascades pour their waters, through the woods, into the narrow channel below. In many parts, magnificent glaciers extend...
Page 44 - The ticks inhabiting regions rich in bird and insect life, but with few mammals, are in the same condition as mosquitoes, as far as the supply of blood goes ; and, like the mosquitoes, they are compelled and able to exist without the nourishment best suited to them. They are nature's miserable castaways, parasitical tribes lost in a great dry wilderness where no blood is ; and every marshborn mosquito, piping of the hunger gnawing its vitals, and every forest tick, blindly feeling with its grappling-irons...
Page 270 - ... mixed with steep slopes — some bearing snow, and others apparently encrusted with sulphur. Cavernous recesses belched forth smoke; the sides of cracks and chasms no more than half-way down shone with ruddy light; and so it continued on all sides, right down to the bottom, precipice alternating with slope, and the fiery fissures becoming more numerous as the bottom was approached.
Page 22 - Indies and it will be only a matter of a few years until the latter are entirely gone. While most of the seedlings are inferior to the kinds usually grown yet we can expect to get a few of exceptional merit out of every thousand grown. Great improvement has been brought about in this way with other plants produced from cuttings, notably the potato.
Page 15 - It is scarcely possible to imagine anything more beautiful than the beryl-like blue of these glaciers, and especially as contrasted with the dead white of the upper expanse of snow. The fragments which had fallen from the glacier into the water were floating away, and the channel, with its icebergs, presented, for the space of a mile, a miniature likeness of the Polar Sea.
Page 252 - I think the main thing in connection with the relatively smooth operation of this international organization is that there is a great deal of work to be done, and it is done without the benefit of microphones in connection with the discussions.

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