Applied Biology: An Elementary Textbook and Laboratory Guide

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Macmillan Company, 1917 - Biology - 583 pages
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Page 544 - The study of practice leads irresistibly to the conclusion that it is impossible to lay down any general rule as to the priority of interests upon all river systems.
Page 495 - A calorie is the amount of heat necessary to raise one gram of water one degree centigrade, the British thermal unit is the amount of heat necessary to raise one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit.
Page 33 - ... showing the driving mechanism, the backs of the near test cards and the exposure disks so positioned in their circle of rotation as to give the details of their construction. The diameter of disks A and Z), when in position, is sufficient to cover all three test objects — the two near test objects one on the right and one on the left of the median plane of the observer and the far test object in the median plane; that of disk B, to cover only the near test object on the left; and that of disk...
Page 590 - CONTENTS INTRODUCTION — THE IMPROVEMENT OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS — PROPAGATION OF PLANTS — PLANT FOOD — THE SOIL — MAINTAINING THE FERTILITY OF THE LAND — SOME IMPORTANT FARM CROPS — ENEMIES OF CROPS — SYSTEMS OF CROPPING — FEEDS AND FEEDING — THE HORSE — CATTLE — SHEEP — SWINE — POULTRY — FARM MANAGEMENT — THE FARM HOUSE — THE FARM COMMUNITY — APPENDIX. The Elements of Agriculture is the work of an experienced instructor with the editorial assistance of Professor...
Page 550 - ... and the general effects of alcohol as a stimulant and as a narcotic. It might be taught that while in moderate quantities beer and wine may be, in a certain sense, a food, they are a very imperfect and expensive kind of food, and are seldom used for food purposes ; that they are not needed by young and healthy persons, and are dangerous to them in so far as they tend to create a habit ; that in certain cases of disease and weakness they are useful in quantities to be prescribed by physicians...
Page 551 - ... temperance drinks," and the general effects of alcohol as a stimulant and as a narcotic. It might be taught that while in moderate quantities beer and wine may be, in a certain sense, a food, they are a very imperfect and expensive kind of food, and are seldom used for food purposes ; that they are not needed by young and healthy persons, and are dangerous to them in so far as they tend to create a habit...
Page 551 - ... dangerous to them in so far as they tend to create a habit; that in certain cases of disease and weakness they are useful in quantities to be prescribed by physicians; that when taken habitually it should be only at meals, and, as a rule, only with the last meal of the day, or soon after it, and that alcoholic drinks of all kinds are worse than useless to prevent fatigue or the effects of cold, although they may at times be useful as restoratives after the work is done. It should also be taught...
Page 550 - ... the use of alcohol entirely unless it be as medicine. It has also led them to feel any statement regarding the moderate use of alcohol, other than absolute disapproval, as injurious to the temperance cause, and hence reprehensible. If I may be permitted the expression of a personal opinion it is that people in health, and especially young people, act most wisely in abstaining from alcoholic beverages...
Page 39 - ... to discover only the tissues. It is now necessary to make use of the microscope in order to see the minute structure of the tissues which we find in organs. (L) If Chapter III has not been studied, a lesson on the use of the compound microscope should be introduced at this point. 92. Cells.
Page 551 - As is. well known, the stem and leaves of the tobacco plant contain a poisonous substance known as nicotine, which, in concentrated doses, quickly kills small animals. However, this proves nothing regarding the effect of smoking tobacco, or of the disgusting habit of chewing it, which is now almost unknown among the better classes of people; for in both of these ways of using tobacco the nicotine is exceedingly diluted, as is the poison found in tea and coffee. The result is that the effects of tobacco...

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