Economics of the Law: Torts, Contracts, Property, Litigation

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Oxford University Press, 1997 - Law - 236 pages
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Over the past two decades, the field of law and economics has matured to the point where scholars have employed the latest economic methods in an effort to understand the nature of legal rules and to suggest how these rules could be reformed. This book is the first to provide a broad survey of this scholarship as it has been applied to problems in tort law, contract law, property law, and litigation. Because of its broad coverage, the book will serve as a convenient reference guide for researchers in the field, a rigorous introduction for economists interested in learning about law and economics, and a useful teaching tool for graduate and advanced undergraduate law and economics courses.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
The Economics of Tort Law The Basic Model
15
The Economics of Tort Law Extensions
39
The Economics of Contract Law Remedies for Breach
71
The Economics of Contract Law Mistake Impossibility and Other Doctrines
92
The Economics of Property Law
115
Government Taking and Regulation of Private Property
137
The Economics of Litigation and Settlement
156
The Economics of Frivolous Litigation
181
Notes
201
References
220
Index
231
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Thomas J. Miceli is at University of Connecticut.

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