Lun YŁ

Front Cover
Penguin, 1979 - Philosophy - 249 pages
20 Reviews
No other book in the entire history of the world has exerted a greater influence on a larger number of people over a longer period of time than this slim volume. The spiritual cornerstone of the most populous and oldest living civilization on Earth, the Analects has inspired the Chinese and all the peoples of East Asia with its affirmation of a humanist ethics. As the Gospels are to Jesus, the Analects is the only place where we can encounter the real, living Confucius. In this gem-like translation by Simon Leys, Confucius speaks with clarity and brilliance. He emerges as a man of great passion and many enthusiasms, a man of bold action whose true vocation is politics. Confucius (551-479 B.C.) lived in an age of acute cultural and political crisis. Many of his observations mark a world sinking into violence and barbarity. Unable to obtain the leading political role he sought, he endeavored to reform society and salvage civilization through ethical debate, defining for ages to come the public mission of the intellectual.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dcunning11235 - LibraryThing

Interesting, in parts. Elsewhere... confusing. Elsewhere... boring and re-re-repetitive. The Analects is collection of aphorisms, fragmentary historical references, fragmentary literary references ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - le.vert.galant - LibraryThing

A splendid version (by Edward Slingerland) of this classic with an extensive selection of historical commentaries by Confucian scholars as well as several useful appendices. This edition is extremely useful and readable. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Acknowledgement
7
Introduction
9
BOOK I
59
BOOK II
63
BOOK III
67
BOOK IV
72
BOOK V
76
BOOK VI
81
BOOK XIV
124
BOOK XV
132
BOOK XVI
138
BOOK XVII
143
BOOK XVIII
149
BOOK XIX
153
BOOK XX
158
Events in the Life of Confucius
161

BOOK VII
86
BOOK VIII
92
BOOK IX
96
BOOK X
101
BOOK XI
106
BOOK XII
112
BOOK XIII
118
Chronology
195
The Disciples as They Appear in the Analects
196
The Lun yu
220
Textual Notes
234
Works Cited
235
Glossary
236
Copyright

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About the author (1979)

D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.
D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.

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